1

People and ecosystems

Understanding of the links between coral reef ecosystems, the goods and services they provide to people, and the wellbeing of human societies.

2

Ecosystem dynamics: past, present and future

Examining the multi-scale dynamics of reefs, from population dynamics to macroevolution

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Responding to a changing world

Advancing the fundamental understanding of the key processes underpinning reef resilience.

Coral Bleaching

Coral Bleaching

Coral Reef Studies

ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies
James Cook University Townsville
Queensland 4811 Australia

Phone: 61 7 4781 4000
Email: info@coralcoe.org.au

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Caribbean wins the seaweed Olympics

07
Jun 2012

A new study finds that Caribbean seaweeds are far better competitors than their equivalents in the Indian and Pacific Oceans. But this triumph is bad news for Caribbean coral reefs.

The picture-postcard beauty of Caribbean reefs owes much to the living corals that build reefs and contribute startling white sand to beaches. Coral reefs might seem to be tranquil environment but in fact a battle is constantly waged between corals and seaweeds that fight over space. Scientists have known for some time that seaweeds can gain the upper hand if corals are damaged by hurricanes or excessively warm sea temperatures that cause coral bleaching. But a new study, published online today, reveals that Caribbean seaweeds are the equivalent of Olympian athletes compared those found on coral reefs elsewhere.

Images: George Roff. High resoultion images are available from George Roff on request.

“Seaweeds bloom four times faster in the Caribbean than the Pacific Ocean”, exclaims study author, Dr George Roff, of the University of Queensland. “This helps explain why corals in the Caribbean seem to be such weak competitors against seaweeds”.

The study raises concerns about the future of Caribbean coral reefs. If seaweeds bloom faster, corals are less likely to recover once they have been damaged.

Coauthor, Professor Peter Mumby, adds, “Seaweeds are able to bloom when we loosen their controls, either by polluting the sea with fertilizers or catching too many parrotfish, who treat seaweed as a delicacy. We now know that seaweeds will bloom if we give them the slightest chance. This means we should redouble our efforts to control pollution and fishing of parrotfishes”.

The study, published in the journal Trends in Ecology and Evolution, cannot yet explain why Caribbean seaweeds are so prolific.

“It is intriguing to see such variability in seaweed behaviour around the world”, says Dr Roff. “We raise a number of possible explanations that scientists will test over the next few years”.

 

 

Free video clips to illustrate this article available at Peter Mumby’s site

Contacts:
George Roff, g.roff@uq.edu.au +61 0432 931 051
Peter Mumby, p.j.mumby@uq.edu.au +61 049811589 (away till 19th June)

Citation:
Roff, G. & Mumby, P.J. (2012) Global disparity in the resilience of coral reefs. Trends in Ecology and Evolution (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/ j.tree.2012.04.007
https://www.coralcoe.org.au/

The ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies are proud sponsors of the 12th International Coral Reef Symposium, Cairns:  9-13 July 2012.

Images: George Roff. High resoultion images are available from George Roff on request.
Images: George Roff. High resoultion images are available from George Roff on request.

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Coral Reef Studies

ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies
James Cook University Townsville
Queensland 4811 Australia

Phone: 61 7 4781 4000
Email: info@coralcoe.org.au