1

People and ecosystems

Understanding of the links between coral reef ecosystems, the goods and services they provide to people, and the wellbeing of human societies.

2

Ecosystem dynamics: past, present and future

Examining the multi-scale dynamics of reefs, from population dynamics to macroevolution

3

Responding to a changing world

Advancing the fundamental understanding of the key processes underpinning reef resilience.

Coral Triangle Initiative

Coral Triangle Initiative

Coral Reef Studies

ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies
James Cook University Townsville
Queensland 4811 Australia

Phone: 61 7 4781 4000
Email: info@coralcoe.org.au

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Introduction  |   Symposium Program   |    Presenters   |   Public Forum

Fremantle Symposium 2011

 

A symposium presenting the latest research, management and policy developments in coral reef systems in Australia, our region, and globally will be held at the Western Australian Maritime Museum in Fremantle on 20th and 21st October 2011. The Fremantle symposium will incorporate presentations by members of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies and other leading scientists and provide an insight into the future of these iconic ecosystems.

Like Queensland, Western Australia (WA) has extensive coral reefs which are of major importance to the state. Uniquely, the coral reefs of Western Australia occur over an extremely large latitudinal gradient of several thousand kilometres, from the tidally-dominated tropical reefs of the Kimberley region to the temperate sub-tropical reefs of the Houtman-Abrolhos Islands and marginal reefs offshore from Perth. The fringing reef systems along the mainly desert coastline of WA are still relatively undisturbed from land-based sources of pollution. However, they are subject to the combined impacts of global warming and ocean acidification caused by rising levels of atmospheric CO2.

The Ningaloo Reef of WA is a key study site to investigate these processes. It is Australia’s largest fringing reef system, has exceptionally high coral cover, and stretches for ~290 km along the desolate northwest coast. Nominated for World heritage listing in January 2010 the Ningaloo coast represents an area of outstanding biodiversity. Coral reef biodiversity underpins the critically important functions and services performed by reef ecosystems, such as sustaining the productivity of fish stocks on which many tropical nations depend for their food security and future development. The latest science on understanding and managing coral reef biodiversity will be a feature of the symposium program.

The coral reefs of Australia, particularly Ningaloo Reef, the Great Barrier Reef and Lord Howe Island World Heritage Area are Australian national icons, of great economic, social, and aesthetic value to this country. Tourism on the Great Barrier Reef alone contributes approximately $5 billion annually to the nation’s economy. Income from recreational and commercial fishing on Australia’s tropical reefs contributes a further $400 million annually. Consequently, science-based management of coral reefs is a national priority.

 

Objectives

Our objectives are to:

Themes

Key issues will include:

Speakers

The symposium will feature presentations from leading coral reef scientists and policy makers including:

Seminars

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Partner Research Institutions

Partner Partner Partner Partner
Coral Reef Studies

ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies
James Cook University Townsville
Queensland 4811 Australia

Phone: 61 7 4781 4000
Email: info@coralcoe.org.au