1

People and ecosystems

Understanding of the links between coral reef ecosystems, the goods and services they provide to people, and the wellbeing of human societies.

2

Ecosystem dynamics: past, present and future

Examining the multi-scale dynamics of reefs, from population dynamics to macroevolution

3

Responding to a changing world

Advancing the fundamental understanding of the key processes underpinning reef resilience.

Coral Bleaching

Coral Bleaching

Coral Reef Studies

ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies
James Cook University Townsville
Queensland 4811 Australia

Phone: 61 7 4781 4000
Email: info@coralcoe.org.au

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Event

Steering coral reefs toward healthier states

When

Thursday, 20 May 2010 12.00pm - 1.00pm

location
ARC Centre of Excellence Conference Room, JCU (DB44).
Presenter
Magnus Nystrom, Department of Systems Ecology and Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University

With regards to avoiding regime shifts Dr Nystrom’s research entails studies of ecological tipping points, and the role of biodiversity buffering disturbance (i.e. the resilience) in coral reefs. To better understand how to reverse already degraded states his research focuses on identifying self-reinforcing (positive) feedback mechanisms that tend to lock reefs in undesirable states; the way human actions influence the strength and direction of these feedbacks, how different feedbacks interact and at what scales they operate. Dr Nystrom’s research also comprises inter-disciplinary studies on how changes in ecological feedbacks interact with socioeconomic processes, potentially generating so called “social-ecological traps”, and how these traps are distributed within society and across scales. Magnus Nystrom received his PhD in 2001 and is currently associated professor at the Department of Systems Ecology, Stockholm University. He is also chairing one of the research themes at the Stockholm Resilience Centre.

ABSTRACT:

Marine ecosystem decline is accelerating. At some point degradation may pass a tipping point beyond which ecosystems become trapped in alternative degraded states, as a result of changes in critical feedbacks. Self-reinforcing feedbacks pose a major challenge for managers and policy-makers seeking remedial actions to curb the marine crisis. A better understanding of the way human actions influence the strength and direction of feedbacks, how different feedbacks interact and at what scales they operate, is crucial for successful implementation of marine ecosystem management.

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Coral Reef Studies

ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies
James Cook University Townsville
Queensland 4811 Australia

Phone: 61 7 4781 4000
Email: info@coralcoe.org.au