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Event

Origins and Function of the Animal Metaorganism – Boden Research Conference

When

Sunday 11th March 2018 - Wednesday 14th March 2018

location
Peppers Blue on Blue Resort, Magnetic Island, Australia

Origins and Function of the Animal Metaorganism

A transdisciplinary workshop investigating the evolutionary success of cnidarian metaorganisms and the conditions that sometimes cause their collapse
11th to 14th March 2018
Peppers Blue on Blue Resort, Magnetic Island, Australia
@CoralCOE #COE_symbiosis

Metaorganism workshop Magnetic Island, March 11th 2018. Credit: Steve Robbins

Why here and why now?

Ideas about how the coral association has succeeded over evolutionary time, and what mechanisms underlie coral tolerance to environmental change, have not changed substantially since the 1970’s. Advancing the field requires bringing in expertise from “left field” as novel perspectives can greatly increase the odds of conceptual breakthroughs being made. These new insights will be relevant to understanding coral reefs on a global scale and also to understanding organism‐microbe interactions more broadly. A specific aim is that the scheduled discussion sessions lead to concrete outcomes in the form of perspective manuscripts.
The meeting will bring together a critical mass of leading researchers across fields as diverse as palaeontology, physiology, microbiology and bioinformatics who are united by an interest in microbe – animal interactions. Our proposed group transcends disciplinary boundaries in an attempt to cross-fertilise thinking about the evolutionary success of the animal metaorganism and the conditions that sometimes cause collapse of these associations. New approaches, insights and thinking in this area are critical because important ecosystems that rely on animal‐microbe interactions, such as coral reefs, are experiencing increasing levels of stress that threaten their long‐term persistence.
We intend that this meeting will provide a broader understanding of the evolutionary forces that have led to the diversity of present day coral metaorganisms. We seek new understanding as to why some coral metaorganisms are more tolerant of environmental change than others, and how flexibility with respect to the associated microbiota might enhance resilience at the metaorganism level.

Sponsors

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Conference Program Here

Sunday 11th March
9:00 – 17:00 Delegates arrive in Townsville, transfers to Pepper’s Blue on Blue Resort, Magnetic Island.
18:30 – 20:30 Welcome drinks and dinner
Monday 12th March
7:00 – 8:20 Breakfast
8:20 – 8:30 Welcome – David Miller and Mia Hoogenboom

Official Opening – Jenny Lappin

8:30 – 9:30 Metaorganisms as the new frontier Thomas Bosch
9:30 – 10:10 QS and QQ in the holobiont Hydra Sebastian Fraune
10:10 – 10:30 The Amphiprion genome Tim Ravasi
10:30 – 10:45 Morning tea
10:45 – 11:05 Host and microbial processes underlying White Syndrome lesions on corals David Bourne
11:05 – 11:20 Rethinking the coral microbiome: simplicity in a diverse microbial biosphere Alejandra Hernandez‐Agreda
11:20 – 11:50 Chasing beneficial microorganisms for corals: characterization of green sulfur bacteria in coral skeletons Sen‐Lin Tang
11:50 – 12:10 Viruses: the neglected part of metaorganisms Tim Lachnit & Thomas Bosch
12:10 – 12:30 Microbial Interactions in sponges: Symbiosis insights derived from basal Metazoa Nicole Webster
12:30 – 13:45 Lunch
13:45 – 14:10 Expression patterns of immune receptors in two marine sponge species Lucia Pita‐Galan
14:10 – 14:25 Status of coral genomics: 2018 and beyond David Miller
14:25 – 14:50 Decoding coral genomes beyond sequencing Emily (Hua) Ying
14:50 – 15:05 Catching a glimpse of the coral proteome with mass spectrometry Ira Cooke
15:05 – 15:45 Afternoon tea
15:45 – 16:30 Emergence of scleractinan corals: Snapshots from the geological past Jarek Stolarski
16:30 – 16:55 Symbiodinium genomes reveal adaptive evolution of functions related to symbiosis CX Chan/Mark Ragan
16:55 – 17:20 Mechanisms for initiating coral‐Symbiodinium symbiosis Shunichi Takahashi
17:20 – 17:45 Establishment of coral‐algal symbiosis from the symbiont perspective: Dual RNA‐Seq approach Amin Mohamed
18:00 – 20:00 Dinner

 

Tuesday 13th March
7:30 – 8:30 Breakfast
8:30 – 9:15 Assembling the (holo)biont in deep time Nick Butterfield
9:15 – 9:35 Evolutionary (meta)genomics of calcareous sponges Maja Adamska
9:35-9:55 Genomics approaches for investigating probable crosstalk between coral and algae Chuya Shinzato
9:55 – 10:15 Understanding coral bleaching in the light of holobiont nutrient cycling Christian Voolstra
10:15 – 10:35 Heatwaves, thermal tolerance and the coral microbiome Tracy Ainsworth
10:35 – 11:15 Morning tea
11:15 – 11:50 Partner switching and its impact on metabolite flux in the cnidarian‐dinoflagellate symbiosis Simon Davy
11:50 – 12:10 The evolutionarily conserved apoptotic machinery in corals Kazuhiro Sakamaki
12:10 – 12:30 Mechanisms of coral heat tolerance – lessons from the naturally extreme Kimberley region in NW Australia Verena Schoepf
12:30 – 13:30 Lunch
13:30 – 14:10 Stability, structure, and sustainability of symbioses: perspectives from plant‐fungal associations Elizabeth Arnold
14:10 – 14:30 Stress transcriptomics: understanding the genetic basis of summer mortality in a different invertebrate ‐ abalone Jan Strugnell
14:30 – 14:50 Impact of hybridization on host‐microbiome community composition: Results from an experimental evolution study Cornelia Jaspers
14:50 – 15:30 Afternoon tea
15:30 – 15:50 Genome sequencing of the Porites lutea holobiont illuminates the roles of coral‐associated microbial symbionts Steven Robbins
15:50 – 16:10 The long and short of microbial genomics Torsten Seemann
16:10 – 16:30 Microbial metagenomics: recent advances and ongoing challenges Aaron Darling
16:30 – 17:30 Discussion groups:

o     Molecular techniques determine what research questions can be answered in metaorganism research (Facilitator: Cooke)

o     Impacts of mutualism on capacity for acclimation/adaptation and rates of evolution (Facilitators: Bosch, Miller)

o     Photosynthetic symbioses – why have Symbiodinium spp been so successful in doing this? (Facilitators: Hoogenboom, Davy)

19:00 – 20:30 Dinner

 

Wednesday 14th March
7:30 – 9:00 Breakfast
9:00 – 10:30 Discussion groups:

o     Molecular techniques determine what research questions can be answered in metaorganism research (Facilitator: Cooke)

o     Impacts of mutualism on capacity for acclimation/adaptation and rates of evolution (Facilitators: Bosch, Miller)

o    Photosynthetic symbioses – why have Symbiodinium spp been so successful in doing this? (Facilitators: Hoogenboom, Davy)

10:30 – 11:00 Morning tea
11:00 – 12:00 Discussion groups (continued)
12:00 – 12:10 Synthesis: Impacts of mutualism on capacity for acclimation/adaptation and rates of evolution Thomas Bosch, David Miller
12:10 – 12:20 Synthesis: Why have Symbiodinium spp been so successful in forming mutualisms? Simon Davy, Mia Hoogenboom
12:20 – 12:30 Synthesis: Molecular techniques determine what research questions can be answered in metaorganism research Ira Cooke
12:30 – 12:45 Closing remarks David Miller / Thomas Bosch / Elizabeth Arnold / Nick Butterfield
12:45 – 14:00 Lunch

Seminars

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Partner Research Institutions

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Coral Reef Studies

ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies
James Cook University Townsville
Queensland 4811 Australia

Phone: 61 7 4781 4000
Email: info@coralcoe.org.au