Research Fellows

Tracy Ainsworth

James Cook University
Email: tracy.ainsworth@jcu.edu.au
Phone: +61 7 4781 4442

Tracy is originally from the North Coast of New South Wales. She completed a BSc in Marine Biology/Aquaculture in 1996 and MSc in Marine Microbiology/Immunology in 2001, both at James Cook University. After working at the University of Queensland for several years she completed a PhD in 2007 at the Center for Marine Studies. Her PhD research investigated the histopathology and microbial ecology of stress and disease in reef corals. Tracy’s broad research interests include stress responses, cell biology, immunity and disease of marine invertebrates.


Jorge G Álvarez Romero

James Cook University
Email: jorge.alvarezromero@jcu.edu.au
Phone: +61 7 4781 6517

Jorge was born and grew up in Mexico City. He completed his BSc in Biology at the National University of Mexico (UNAM) with a research on invasive alien species in Mexico and did a Master degree in Management, Conservation and International Trade of Species at the International University of Andalusia (UNIA), Spain. He completed his PhD in Integrated Land-Sea Conservation Planning at James Cook University. Previous experiences include conservation, management, trade and sustainable use of wildlife. Jorge is currently working with the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University, Australia, under the supervision of Professor Bob Pressey, who leads Program 6 “Conservation Planning for a Sustainable Future” of the Centre.


Andrew Baird

James Cook University
Email: andrew.baird@jcu.edu.au
Phone: +61 7 4781 4857

Andrew grew up in Sydney, Australia. He completed a BSc with 1st class Honours in Marine Ecology in 1994 and a Phd in Marine Ecology in 2001 both at James Cook University. His current research focuses on the evolution of life histories and biogeographical patterns in reproductive ecology of scleractinian corals.


Dorothea Bender

University of Queensland
Email: d.bender@uq.edu.au
Phone: +61 7 3346 3063

Doro profileDorothea is originally from Germany, where she completed her MSc in Biology at the University of Bremen. Dorothea was a PhD student at the Coral Reef Ecosystems Lab at UQ and investigated the effects of elevated sea surface temperature and ocean acidification on coral reef algae (supervisors: Sophie Dove and Guillermo Diaz-Pulido). She included various growth forms and taxa in her experiments, looked at turf algal communities as well as macroalgal responses to the changed environmental conditions.

After working as a project manager on the development of a MOOC (massive open online course) at the Global Change Institute, she re-joined the Coral Reef Ecosystems Lab in 2014 as a postdoctoral research fellow. Dorothea’s current research focuses on coral reef metabolism, mainly in terms of productivity and calcification, and how it varies between distinct reef zones. She is also interested in how coral reef metabolism will be affected by future conditions.


Jessica Blythe

James Cook University
Email: jessica.blythe@jcu.edu.au
Phone: +61 7 4781 3198

Corporate portraits of staff at the ARC Coral Reef Studies Jessica grew up in Newfoundland, Canada.  She completed a BSc from Memorial University in 2004 with a focus on juvenile cod behaviour.  After spending a year living in Malawi, she switched from marine biology into the social sciences and completed a Masters from York University in 2009.  In 2013, Jessica earned her PhD from the University of Victoria in 2013, which investigated fishers’ resilience and vulnerability in coastal Mozambique. In September 2013, Jessica joined the CoE as a postdoctorate research fellow.  She uses social science methods to explore life in remote fishing communities in the Solomon Islands, Vanuatu and Kiribati.


Pim Bongaerts

University of Queensland
Email: pim@uq.edu.au
Phone: +61 7 4978 1253

Pim BongaertsPim is originally from the Netherlands where he completed a BSc in Biology at Utrecht University and a MSc in Limnology and Oceanography at The University of Amsterdam. He came out to Australia towards the end of his MSc degree in 2006 and then stayed on to do a PhD at The University of Queenland investigating the extent of genetic connectivity between shallow and deep coral populations. After finishing his PhD, Pim completed a one-year post-doctoral fellowship (2011-2012). More recently, he has started at the Global Change Institute where he will be coordinating the Deep Reef component of the Catlin Seaview Survey. His current research focuses on deep coral reefs (30-150m) and the role these so-called “mesophotic reefs” may play as refugia from the environmental disturbances that are affecting shallow-water reefs. Using a range of molecular techniques he studies how corals may have adapted to the unique environmental conditions on these deep reefs, and whether or not their coral larvae will be able to aid in the recovery of disturbed shallow reef systems.


Mary Bonin

James Cook University
Email: mary.bonin@jcu.edu.au
Phone: +61 7 4781 4119

Mary is originally from chilly Minneapolis (USA) and was awarded a B.A. in Biology from Colorado College (2002) before moving to tropical Townsville (Australia). In 2011 she received a PhD in Marine Ecology from James Cook University for her research into the effects of habitat degradation on coral-associated reef fishes. In 2012 Mary joined the CoE as a postdoc investigating connectivity of coral reef fish populations among fished and protected areas on the Great Barrier Reef. She is also interested in examining effects of habitat fragmentation and loss on population and community processes in coral reef fishes. In addition to research, Mary enjoys teaching and is involved with courses on sampling design, statistics and marine conservation biology at JCU.


Yves-Marie Bozec

University of Queensland
Email: y.bozec@uq.edu.au
Phone: +61 7 3365 1671

Yves Marie Bozec

Yves-Marie is from France, and received a PhD in Marine Ecology from the University Pierre et Marie Curie, studying reef fish ecology in New Caledonia.  His current research interests are in the mechanisms regulating the demographic abundance of corals and reef-associated fish. Yves-Marie work focuses on the dynamics of coral populations in response to climate-driven disturbances and the overfishing of herbivores. This research contributes to the evaluation of reef resilience and addresses questions relative to reef conservation, especially in the Caribbean.


Tom Bridge

James Cook University
Email: thomas.bridge@jcu.edu.au
Phone: +61 7 4781 6189

Tom is originally from Sydney, Australia, and completed an honours degree in Marine Science at the University of Sydney in 2005. After a working in the tourism industry on the Great Barrier Reef, he moved to Townsville in 2007 to begin his PhD in the School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, JCU. His PhD research focussed on the benthic ecology of mesophotic coral ecosystems on the Great Barrier Reef. Tom has a broad interest in the biodiversity and biogeography of corals reefs, and his current research is focussed on understanding coral reef biodiversity in deeper waters beyond SCUBA diving depth, the relationship between deep and shallow reef habitats and the potential for deep reefs to provide refuge for coral reef species from climate change impacts.


Jana Brotankova

James Cook University
Email: jana.brotankova@jcu.edu.au
Phone: +61 7 4781 5222

Corporate portraits of staff at the ARC Coral Reef StudiesJana arrived from a cold Europe where she completed her masters and PhD in plasma physics. After working in several European fusion centers – Italy, Spain, Germany, Netherlands but most of all in her home institute in Prague, she took off for postdoc positions in India and ANU, Canberra. Now, she is part of Program 6. With her unusual background, she is exploiting her programming skills which she gained during her research, and her strong analytic skills, as the mathematics and mathematical logic is one of the foot-stones of her education and lifestyle.


Joshua Cinner

James Cook University
Email: joshua.cinner@jcu.edu.au
Phone: +61 7 4781 6751

Josh CinnerJosh grew up in Massachusetts, USA. He completed a Masters degree in Marine Affairs from the University of Rhode Island in 2000 and a PhD from James Cook University in 2006. His research focuses on using social science to improve coral reef management.


Sean Connolly

James Cook University
Email: sean.connolly@jcu.edu.au
Phone: +61 7 4781 4242

Sean ConnollySean Connolly was born and grew up in Evansville, Indiana, USA, a long way from the ocean. He received a B.A. in Biology from Earlham College (USA) in 1994, from whence he began his scientific career with a paper on spider web orientation in 1992. He received a PhD in Biological Sciences from Stanford University (USA) in 1999, for research on the ecology of temperate rocky shores. During a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Arizona (USA), as part of the Research Training Group in Biological Diversification (1998-2000), he shifted his focus to paleobiology, examining the global dynamics of biodiversity in the fossil record. Since then, he has been at James Cook University as a Lecturer (2000-2002), Senior Lecturer (2003-2006), and Associate Professor (2007), where he has developed a research program in ecological modelling applied to coral reefs. His principal focus is coral reef biodiversity, but he is also active in the areas of physiological ecology, larval ecology, and population dynamics. Sean currently holds an ARC Australian Professorial Fellowship (2008-2012).


Mike Fabinyi

James Cook University
Email: michael.fabinyi@jcu.edu.au
Mike FabinyiMike is originally from Melbourne, where he completed his undergraduate degree in Anthropology. He obtained his PhD at the Australian National University in 2009. His research broadly focuses on the social and political aspects of marine resource management in the Asia-Pacific region.


Sofia Fortunato

James Cook University
Email: sofia.valerofortunato@jcu.edu.au
Phone: +61 7 4781 6294

Sofia FortunatoSofia is a native of Venezuela who obtained a MSc. in Microbiology and a PhD in Evolutionary Developmental Biology at the University of Bergen, Norway. During her PhD  she used genomics and transcriptomics to understand the evolution of developmental genes in sponges. Her future research will integrate ecology, genetics and developmental biology to expand knowledge on sponges associated with coral reefs. Her opening project will use genomic and transcriptomic data to compare the calcifying machinery in calcisponges with those of hard and soft coral, and how these systems respond to elevated CO2 and other human induced environmental stresses.


Jim Falter

University of Western Australia
Email: jim.falter@uwa.edu.au
Phone: +61 8 6488 7328

Jim FalterJim received his PhD in Chemical Oceanography from the University of Hawaii in 2002 following his completion of an MS from the same program in 1998. He also holds a BS in Civil and Environmental Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research focuses largely on climatic forcing of carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus cycles in coral reef communities.


Manuel Gonzalez Rivero

University of Queensland
Email: m.gonzalezrivero@uq.edu.au
Phone: +61 7 3365 3452

Manuel Gonzalez Rivero

Manuel received his PhD in Biological Sciences at the University of Exeter and under the supervision of Prof Peter J. Mumby. His research centres on applying multidisciplinary approaches to understand drivers of change in coral reefs ecosystems, and ultimately, to inform ecosystem-based management. Manuel’s research areas of interest generally lay on spatial and temporal ecology of coral reefs, as well as ecosystem-based, statistical mathematical modelling. From 2012 Manuel joined the University of Queensland, as a Post-Doctoral fellow and under the supervision of Prof Ove Hoegh-Guldberg and A/Prof Sophie Dove. During this time, he investigated putative impacts of changing oceans on the phenological response of sponge reproduction, in particular simulating scenarios of ocean warming and acidifications using an experimental framework. More recently, Manuel has been working as part of the lead scientists of the Catlin Seaview Survey, a featured and international project of the Global Change Institute, University of Queensland. The Catlin Seaview Survey (CSS) aims at understanding global patterns and drivers of coral reef change using innovative technological approaches.


Nick Graham

James Cook University
Email: nick.graham@jcu.edu.au
Phone: +61 7 4781 6291

Nick GrahamNick is from the Lake District in the UK, about 4000km from the nearest tropical coral reef. He obtained a BSc(Hons) degree in Zoology from Newcastle University in 1999, a Master of Applied Science in Tropical Marine Ecology from James Cook University in 2002 and, after a few years working as a Research Associate in Prof Nick Polunin’s group, a PhD from Newcastle University in 2008. His current research focuses on the impacts of climate change to reef systems, and the physical, ecological and management properties that promote recovery and resilience.


Alastair Harborne

University of Queensland
Email: a.harborne@uq.edu.au
Phone: +61 7 3365 1671

Alastair HarborneAlastair is from the UK, and obtained a degree in marine biology from the University of Southampton, where he first became interested in coral reef fishes. He then spent 8 years working for Coral Cay Conservation, managing  volunteer reef surveys in the Caribbean and Pacific. He then worked with Peter Mumby to complete his PhD at the University of Exeter, studying reef ecology and conservation in The Bahamas. This work continued through a NERC Research Fellowship at Exeter, focusing on reef fishes. He is now an ARC DECRA Fellow, studying the ecology of fishes on reef flat habitats along the Great Barrier Reef, while maintaining a research programme on fish ecology in The Bahamas.


Hugo Harrison

James Cook University
Email: hugo.harrison@jcu.edu.au
Phone: +61 7 4781 6358

HarrisonHugo’s research is broadly focused on the role of no-take marine reserves in the management and conservation of coral reef fishes. His current research projects apply methods of parentage analysis in commercially and recreationally important reef fish to assess the level of demographic connectivity between fish populations. Understanding these processes is of critical importance to the effective conservation of marine biodiversity, fisheries management and the design of marine protected areas in the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park and throughout the world.


Christina Hicks

James Cook University
Email: christina.hicks@.jcu.edu.au
Phone: +61 7 4781 4000

HicksChristina is an interdisciplinary social science early career fellow co-funded between the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies and Stanford University’s Center for Ocean Solutions. Christina’s research aims to develop a better understanding of how individuals value ecosystem services, and how together with their social characteristics these values influence how people are likely to respond to environmental and policy change. Christina earned her MSc in Tropical Coastal Management from Newcastle University, UK, where she also worked as a research associate. Prior to this Christina worked as a fisheries scientist in Kenya.


Ove Hoegh-Guldberg

University of Queensland
Email: oveh@uq.edu.au
Phone: +61 7 3365 1156

Ove Hoegh-Guldberg_imageOve is a Deputy Director in the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, Director of the Global Change Institute at the University of Queensland, and an Australian Laureate Fellow  (2013-2018). His research interests span a broad range of topics including marine biology, evolution, physiology, biochemistry and molecular biology of plant-animal symbioses, co-evolution, coral bleaching and climate change. Ove was elected as a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science in 2013 and has published over 200 papers, including 16 in Science and Nature. He is reviewing editor at Science Magazine.


Andrew Hoey

James Cook University
Email: andrew.hoey1@jcu.edu.au
Phone: +61 7 4781 5979

Andy HoeyAndrew is originally from Sydney, where he completed a Bachelor of Economics at Macquarie University. In 1995 he changed focus, moving to James Cook University (JCU) to study marine ecology. After completing his undergraduate degree, Andrew worked for several years as a research officer and manager of the reef fish biology lab at JCU (1999-2006), before commencing his PhD. During his PhD (2006-2010) he studied fish-macroalgal interactions, in particular the ecosystem role of macroalgal browsing fishes on coral reefs. He worked as an experimental scientist for the Australian Institute of Science (2010-2011) before obtaining a postdoctoral fellowship with King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (Saudi Arabia). His research is focused on understanding the functional importance of different herbivorous fishes, the differential responses of herbivorous fishes to changes in the benthic structure of coral reef habitats, and the relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem function. In 2011 he was also awarded a Churchill Fellowship to work with Prof Mark Hay, examining the chemical ecology of macroalgal-coral interactions.


Terry Hughes

James Cook University
Email: terry.hughes@jcu.edu.au
Phone: +61 7 4781 4000

Terry HughesProfessor Terry Hughes is an Australian Research Council Federation Fellow (2002-2007, 2007-2012) and Director of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (since 2005). Professor Hughes was elected a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science in 2001, and was a member of the Expert Advisory Committee for Australian National Research Priorities in 2002. He is a Fellow and Board Member of the Beijer International Institute for Ecological Economics at the Royal Swedish Academy of Science, Stockholm, and a member of the Board of Directors of the Resilience Alliance. He has been awarded numerous prizes awards, including the Centenary Medal of Australia, the Silver Jubilee Award for Excellence of the Australian Marine Science Association in 2004, the 2007 Sherman Eureka Prize for Environmental Research, and the 2008 quadrennial Darwin Medal of the International Society for Coral Reef Studies. According to ISI Science Citation Index, Professor Hughes is ranked number one globally for citations to individual researchers in coral reef science. He has published 18 papers in Science and Nature. In the past 2-3 years, his research has increasingly evolved in a new direction, moving from an ecological focus to a broader evaluation of the linkages between coral reef ecosystems, the goods and services they provide to people, and the welfare of human societies.


Andreas Kubicek

University of Queensland
Email: a.kubicek@uq.edu.au
Phone: +61 7 334 63063

Andreas KubicekAndreas originally come from Germany where he completed a Master in Biology for which he did field work and experiments on algae in the intertidal of Japan, before he changed his  focus to ecological modelling during his PhD.  Andreas came out to Australia to join Ove Hoegh-Guldberg’s group in the ARC Laureate project to study effects of Climate Change on metabolism of coral reef communities.

Andreas research focus is on ecosystem functions and functioning, non-linear dynamics and emergent properties of self-organizing processes. He uses spatially explicit, individual-based modelling to integrate current knowledge and simulate benthic coral reef communities under the influence of various sources of environmental change to complement ongoing science, help to identify gaps, and aid to scrutinize potential management plans and actions in globally changing environments.


Nils Krueck

University of Queensland
Email: n.krueck@uq.edu.au
Phone: +61 7 3365 1671

nils

Nils was born and raised in Germany. He moved to Australia in 2007 to complete a MSc in Marine Biology. He continued with a PhD in Marine and Fisheries Science at the University of Queensland. Nils has a broad interest in marine ecology and natural resource management, particularly in fish population dynamics and spatial fisheries management. His current work aims at advancing the theory of marine reserve network design in order to support both coral reef conservation as well as the productivity of reef fisheries. Nils’ work is focused on reef fisheries and conservation in the Coral Triangle region, specifically in the Indonesian Sunda Banda seascape.


Bill Leggat

James Cook University
Email: bill.leggat@jcu.edu.au
Phone: +61 7 4781 6923

Bill Leggat_imageBill studies the dinoflagellate Symbiodinium, and his research focuses on linking changes in the gene expression of Symbiodinium to physiological of the algae and the intact coral holobiont (its host), and subsequent ecological changes. In particular, he is interested in how these dinoflagellates respond to human induced stress, such as climate change, what effects these changes have on the coral host and how these responses of the alga effect the future of coral reefs as we know them.


Ryan Lowe

University of Western Australia
Email: ryan.lowe@uwa.edu.au
Phone: +61 8 6488 2706

RLoweRyan is an Australian Research Council Future Fellow, a Professor at the University of Western Australia, and a Chief Investigator of the new ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies. He has a unique background in coastal oceanography and environmental engineering that enables him to tackle complex (and often multidisciplinary) research problems in coral reef systems. Major areas of research focus include: understanding how ocean dynamics drive physical and other environmental variability within coral reefs; how these dynamics influence a range of complex biophysical processes, and finally how these processes can be numerically predicted and accurately forecast into the future.


Vimoksalehi Lukoschek

James Cook University
Email: vimoksalehi.lukoschek@jcu.edu.au
Vimoksalehi LukoschekVimoksalehi (Vee) grew up in Melbourne and spent most of her 20’s in Europe working as a nurse. In her early 30’s she made a career shift and moved to Townsville to study marine and conservation biology at James Cook University. She obtained a First Class Honours (1999) on the foraging ecology of coral reef fishes and a PhD (2008) on the molecular ecology of sea snakes. Following her PhD, Vimoksalehi spent a few years as Postdoctoral Fellow in Prof John Avise’s group at UC Irvine, where she continued her molecular genetic research on sea snakes. Vimoksalehi’s research interests also includes marine mammals and she worked as Research Associate in Scott Baker’s lab in New Zealand using forensic genetics to investigate the whale meat markets of Japan and Korea. Vimoksalehi’s current research interests include seascape genetics, coral connectivity, and marine protected areas, as well as the conservation of sea snakes on Australia’s coral reefs.


Malcolm McCulloch

University of Western Australia
Email: malcolm.mcculloch@uwa.edu.au
Phone: +61 8 6488 1921

Malcolm-McCulloch-94x100Malcolm is a Deputy Director of the ARC Centre and an Australian Laureate Fellow (2013-2018) at the University of Western Australia. Malcolm’s research interests focus on the modern part of the geologic record using isotopic and trace element geochemical methods to determine how climate and anthropogenic processes have influenced both past and present environments with particular emphasis on coral reefs. Malcolm has received a number of prestigious awards, most recently in 2010 he was elected as a Fellow to The Royal Society. In 2009 he was awarded the Jaeger Medal for his career achievement in the Earth Sciences and has Fellowships of the Australian Academy of Science (2004), the Geological Society of Australia (2007), the Geochemical Society (2008) and the American Geophysical Union (2002). Malcolm is an ISI Highly Cited Researcher and has published over 250 scientific papers in leading international journals including 23 in Science and Nature.


Vanessa Messmer

James Cook University
Email: vanessa.messmer@jcu.edu.au
Phone: +61 7 4781 5531

Vanessa MessmerVanessa grew up in a few places, but has her roots in France and Germany. She moved to Townsville in 2000, where she completed a BSc with Honours in Marine Biology in 2003. After working at the University of Perpignan (France) for a couple of years, she returned to JCU and obtained her PhD in 2010. Her research focuses on the causes and consequences of biodiversity loss from a genetic to ecosystem level in coral reef fish assemblages, as well as the effects of climate change on reef organisms.


Tiffany Morrison

James Cook University
Email: tiffany.morrison@jcu.edu.au
Phone: +61 7 4781 6825

Tiffany MorrisonTiffany Morrison’s research focuses on understanding and improving the design of complex and multi-scalar environmental governance regimes. Before arriving at James Cook University in 2015, she was a tenured faculty member in the School of Geography, Planning & Environmental Management at The University of Queensland and the School of Political and International Studies at Flinders University. Her approach is based on the development of an empirical database of specific national cases and transnational trends across the US, Australia, and Asia. This systematic comparative approach has generated important contributions to governance theory and practice, particularly in the area of decentralisation, regionalisation and risk. Tiffany also works closely with a range of physical, natural, and social scientists and policymakers on inter- disciplinary approaches to complex environmental governance problems. She holds undergraduate degrees in environmental science and environmental planning, and a PhD in political geography (University of Queensland).


Aurelie Moya

James Cook University
Email: aurelie.moya@jcu.edu.au
Phone: +61 7 4781 3654

Corporate portraits of staff at the ARC Coral Reef StudiesAurelie is originally from France. She completed her PhD at the Scientific Centre of Monaco (2004-2007) where she studied the relation that exists between calcification and photosynthesis in Cnidarian-Dinoflagellate symbiosis. From 2007 to 2009, she held a Lecturer position at the University of Nice where she studied the molecular dialogue between the two partners of the symbiosis, and more particularly the molecular response to heat stress. In 2009, Aurelie was awarded a European fellowship from the Marie Curie actions. She shared her time between Australia (ARC CoE for Coral Reefs Studies, Townsville) and France (UPMC-CNRS, Villefranche-sur-mer), and investigated the timely topic of ocean acidification’s impact on marine invertebrates using high-throughput sequencing. Her current research focuses on understanding how reef-building corals function at the molecular level, how they build their skeleton, and why they fail to do so when they are under stress.


Peter Mumby

University of Queensland
Email: p.j.mumby@uq.edu.au
Phone: +61 7 3365 1686

Peter MumbyProfessor Peter Mumby moved to the University of Queensland in 2010 to take up an Australian Laureate Fellowship. Peter was a Professor in the School of Biological Sciences at the University of Exeter. His research on coral reef remote sensing remains the most-heavily cited in the field and has strongly influenced the monitoring of marine ecosystems from space. Before embarking on a research career, Peter spent two years designing marine reserves in Belize where he experienced, first hand, the limited scientific basis for such planning. This experience was highly influential in defining and driving his research, which has been dedicated to conducting applied science in support of the management of coral reefs. In 1997 he obtained a PhD in coral reef remote sensing and then used two post-doctoral fellowships to broaden his expertise into empirical reef ecology and ecological modelling. Today, Peter uses remotely-sensed data to scale up ecological models so that they are spatially-realistic and able to inform conservation decisions directly.


Philip Munday

James Cook University
Email: philip.munday@jcu.edu.au
Phone: +61 7 4781 5341

Philip MundayPhilip grew up in Tasmania where he was surrounded by beautiful forests, great trout fishing, and superb (but chilly) temperate-water diving. He spent a number of years working overseas as a dive guide before returning to Australia and moving to Townsville to study marine biology. He completed his PhD (1996-1999) in Marine Ecology at James Cook University. Philip has conducted extensive research on the reproductive ecology of reef fishes. His current research focuses on fish-habitat associations and the impact of climate change on reef fish communities.


Kirsty Nash

James Cook University
Email: kirsty.nash@jcu.edu.au
Phone: +61 7 4781 3189

Kirsty is originally from the UK, where she studied Oceanography with Marine Biology (BSc Hons). She moved to Townsville in 2002 and completed a MAppSci in Tropical Marine Ecology at James Cook University. She spent a number of years doing field research and teaching field techniques in association with the Marine Park Authority in the Seychelles, and teaching college level courses in marine biology and oceanography in the Caribbean. In 2009 she returned to Australia, completing a a PhD at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University.  Her thesis looked at the scales at which fish are functioning on the reef and how this contributes to resilience.  Current research interests are management of data poor fisheries and the spatial ecology of reef fishes.


Morgan Pratchett

James Cook University
Email: morgan.pratchett@jcu.edu.au
Phone: +61 7 4781 5747

Morgan is originally from Botswana, but spent his childhood in Kununurra, north-western Australia. He completed his BSc with honours (1992-1996) and Phd (1996-2001) in Marine Ecology, at James Cook University. His current research focuses on major perturbations and threats to coral reef ecosystems, such as climate induced coral bleaching and outbreaks of crown-of-thorns starfish.


Bob Pressey

James Cook University
Email: bob.pressey@jcu.edu.au
Phone: +61 7 4781 6194

Professor Bob Pressey has worked on the theory, techniques and practice of conservation planning as a private environmental consultant, then as a research scientist with the New South Wales National Parks and Wildlife Service, and now at James Cook University. During his career, he has combined scientific research with policy development and collaboration with practitioners in Australia and internationally. His publications have had a high scientific impact. He is an ISI highly cited researcher in the field of Environment/Ecology with more than 4000 non-self citations of his papers and book chapters. His influence on practice includes close involvement with the systematic design of about 1 million hectares of reserves in New South Wales and collaborative projects that have influenced conservation decisions extensively in other countries. He has current projects in China, South Africa, Brazil, Papua New Guinea and Mexico, including two global biodiversity hotspots. His awards and prizes include the New South Wales Premier’s Public Sector Environment Award (2004), the Eureka Prize for Biodiversity Research (2002), and the major annual award from the Society for Conservation Biology (2001). An important feature of his new research program will be the close involvement of practitioners and other stakeholders representing local, regional, state and national agencies, non-government organisations and community groups.


Jairo Rivera

James Cook University
Email: jairo.rivera@jcu.edu.au
Phone: +61 7 4781 4850

Jairo was born in Colombia. He completed his DVM (Hons) at the University of Caldas (1999). After that he did 3 GradDip in Medical imaging (Radiology, Ultrasound, CT and MRI). Then Jairo obtained his first Doctorate in Veterinary Science with emphasis in Animal Surgery and Medicine at the University of Leon (Spain) awarding a Summa Cum Laude and patented his Bone graft (2005). Jairo worked as a professor of animal surgery, radiology and internal medicine for seven years and then made a career shift and moved to Australia and completed a PhD in Marine Biology and Microbiology at James Cook University (2012). Actually he is working as a research fellow at the ARC Centre of Excellence. Jairo has broad interests in clinical diagnosis of marine diseases and host-pathogen interactions. The primary focus of his research is the Pathogenesis of Crown of Thorns (Acanthaster planci).


Jodie Rummer

James Cook University
Email: jodie.rummer@jcu.edu.au
Phone: +61 7 4781 5300

Jodie is originally from the USA where she completed honours, BSc, and MSc degrees in Biology and Marine Biology in Illinois and West Florida before moving to Vancouver, Canada to commence a PhD at the University of British Columbia. Her PhD research investigated oxygen uptake and delivery mechanisms in fish during stress, but she has also done extensive research on buoyancy, exercise, and oxygen and temperature stress in fish. After a post-doctoral fellowship in Hong Kong (2010-2011), she joined the ARC CoECRS where she is applying her broad research interests in conservation physiology. Jodie’s research aims to understand how evolutionary pressures have shaped physiological systems and the degree to which adaptation and acclimation to natural and environmental perturbations, such as anthropogenic climate change, can occur.


Eugenia Sampayo

University of Queensland
Email: e.sampayo@uq.edu.au
Phone: +61 7 3365 2729

Eugenia SampayoEugenia was born in The Netherlands and sparked a passion for the ocean after spending part of her childhood living on the Caribbean island of Curacao (Dutch Antilles). She completed a MSc in Marine biology focused on coral reproduction and evolutionary ecology at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands, then moved to Australia to do a PhD in Marine Science at the University of Queensland. After completion of her PhD in 2008, she has worked in the USA and Japan. Eugenia’s research focuses on the ecology and functional significance of the symbiotic dinoflagellates (Symbiodinium) that associate with corals. She is particularly interested symbioses ecology and evolution, species ranges and flexibility of symbiotic partnerships in response to climate change.


Verena Schoepf

The University of Western Australia
Email: verena.schoepf@uwa.edu.au
Phone: +61 8 6488 6767

Verena SchoepfVerena is originally from Austria where she obtained a Bachelor’s degree in Biology and a Master’s degree in Zoology from the University of Innsbruck. She then started a PhD in Geological Sciences at The Ohio State University where she studied the impacts of combined climate change stressors on coral physiology and biogeochemistry. Verena is now a postdoctoral research fellow at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at the University of Western Australia. Her current research focuses on the physical and chemical controls on coral calcification and the response of coral reef systems generally to climate change using geochemical approaches.


Ruth Thurstan

University of Queensland
Email: r.thurstan@uq.edu.au
Phone: +61 7 3365 2529

Ruth ThurstonRuth grew up in the Peak District in the UK, many miles from the sea. She graduated from Liverpool University with a BSc (Hons) in Marine Biology in 2004, and completed an MSc in Marine Environmental Management at York University in 2007. Ruth continued at York to complete her PhD on shifting baselines and the impact of industrial fishing on the UK marine environment in June 2011. She has recently started at the University of Queensland and plans to investigate the history of exploitation of Australian fisheries and marine mega-fauna.


Heather Veilleux

James Cook University
Email: heather.veilleux@jcu.edu.au
Phone: +61 7 4781 4850

Heather Veilleux

Heather is from Ottawa, Canada. She completed a BSc in Biochemistry at the University of Ottawa in 2006. After working for two years at Health Canada in a genetics laboratory, Heather applied to James Cook University to combine her interests in genetics and marine biology. Following a Masters in Applied Science in 2010, Heather completed her PhD in 2014. Her research focuses on genomic mechanisms for acclimation to climate change in coral reef fishes, with particular interest in the mechanisms for epigenetic inheritance.


Sue-Ann Watson

James Cook University
Email: sueann.watson@jcu.edu.au
Phone: +61 7 4781 4804

Watson_thumbOriginally from the UK, Sue-Ann was awarded a BSc (Hons) in Biology from the University of Nottingham and MSc in Oceanography from the National Oceanography Centre, University of Southampton. Continuing at Southampton, Sue-Ann researched evolutionary trends across latitudinal gradients in marine invertebrates for her PhD to better understand how adaptive traits change along environmental gradients from the tropics to the poles, in collaboration with the British Antarctic Survey, National University of Singapore, University of Melbourne and James Cook University. Sue-Ann’s current research focuses on the effects of global change, particularly ocean acidification, on marine organisms including invertebrates and fishes. Sue-Ann’s broad research interests include ecology, physiology, behaviour and the potential for acclimation and adaptation to ocean acidification in marine organisms.


Rebecca Weeks

James Cook University
Email: rebecca.weeks@jcu.edu.au
Phone: +61 7 4781 6134

Corporate portraits of staff at the ARC Coral Reef StudiesAfter completing a Masters degree in Zoology at the University in Sheffield (UK), Rebecca moved to Australia to pursue her interest in marine conservation in warmer climes. Her PhD, undertaken at James Cook University, explored approaches to developing marine protected area networks in the Philippines. Following an 18-month fellowship with the Wildlife Conservation Society in Fiji, Rebecca returned to the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies in 2012 as a research fellow in the Conservation Planning for a Sustainable Future group.


Amelia Wenger

James Cook University
Email: amelia.wenger1@jcu.edu.au
Phone: +61 7 4781 4804

Corporate portraits of staff at the ARC Coral Reef StudiesAmelia grew up in Washington, D.C., far away from coral reefs.  She completed her B.A. in Biology at Barnard College of Columbia University in New York in 2007. She moved to Australia and completed a graduate diploma in research methods at James Cook University. She completed her PhD in mid-2013, which focused on the behavioural and physiological effects of suspended sediment on coral reef fishes. Amelia is currently working with the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University, under the supervision of Professor Bob Pressey. Her work focuses on prioritizing management action on islands in the southern Great Barrier Reef and on the ecological ramifications of different development scenarios in the Great Barrier Reef coastal zone.


Ke Zhang

James Cook University
Email: ke.zhang1@jcu.edu.au
Phone: +61 7 4781 3194

DSC_0179_2345看图王Ke is originally from China, where he completed his Ph.D degree in physical Geography in 2010, with special focus on paleoecology and paleoclimatology. He then moved to UK to take up a postdoctoral fellowship at University of Southampton (2011-2013), where he investigated the nonlinear interactions between ecosystem services and human wellbeing from an evolutionary (historical) perspective. Ke joined the CoE as a research fellow in late 2013. His work here will continue to focus on the dynamics of linked social-ecological systems. He will test and develop resilience theories and apply them to rapidly developing countries (mainly China) to understand the nonlinear interactions between ecosystem and society, such as regime shift, transient dynamic, and reinforce feedback and connectivity issues.


Zhenlin Zhang

University of Western Australia
Email: zhenlin.zhang@uwa.edu.au
Phone: +61 8 6488 6093

Zhenlin came from China, where she obtained a BS in water resources and hydrology engineering at Wuhan University and an MS in the same discipline at Sun Yat-sen University. In 2011, she was awarded a PhD degree in oceanography at the University of Western Australia. Her current research focuses on developing spatial-explicit models of nutrient and calcification processes in coral reef systems and investigating how the physical and biogeochemical processes offshore influences coral reef communities nearshore.

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