News Stories

Special Recent Posts

Ashton Gainsford

22nd April, 2014

Ashton Gainsford

Fish behaving badly on acid

14th April, 2014

In a world-first study published today, researchers have found that fish in the wild respond adversely to ocean acidification.Fish behaving badly on acid

WA corals reveal changes to ocean currents and temperatures

3rd April, 2014

A new study published in the international journal Nature Communications has revealed how Western Australia's coral reefs have been affected by changing ocean currents, rising sea surface temperatures and sea level variability.WA corals reveal changes to ocean currents and temperatures

Fish living near the equator will not thrive in the warmer oceans of the future

11th February, 2014

According to an international team of researchers, the rapid pace of climate change is threatening the future presence of fish near the equator.Fish living near the equator will not thrive in the warmer oceans of the future

Waves costly for fish

4th February, 2014

Big waves are energetically costly for fish, and there are more big waves than ever. The good news is that fish might be able to adapt.Waves costly for fish

Jumping snails left grounded in future oceans

7th January, 2014

Sea snails that leap to escape their predators may soon lose their extraordinary jumping ability because of rising human carbon dioxide emissions, a team of international scientists has discovered.Jumping snails left grounded in future oceans

Breaking News – Coral Centre awarded 7 years of funding

24th December, 2013

The ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies has been awarded $A28m by the Australian Research Council for 2014 to 2020.Breaking News – Coral Centre awarded 7 years of funding

Linking social science and ecology to solve the world’s environmental problems

4th December, 2013

Researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (CoECRS) at James Cook University are engaging social science to help solve some of the world’s biggest environmental problems.Linking social science and ecology to solve the world’s environmental problems

Reef fish find it’s too hot to swim

27th November, 2013

We all know the feeling, it’s a hot summer afternoon and you have no appetite and don’t want to do anything apart from lay on the couch. A team of researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University has shown that ocean warming may make some large reef fish feel the same way.Reef fish find it’s too hot to swim

Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander teens merge traditional ecological knowledge with marine science on Orpheus Island

29th October, 2013

Few get to experience Orpheus Island in their lifetime, but this weekend a team of 40 high school students embark on an overnight trip to the island on the Great Barrier Reef as the very first participants in the Aboriginals and Torres Strait Islanders in Marine Science (ATSIMS) initiative.Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander teens merge traditional ecological knowledge with marine science on Orpheus Island

Science and tradition secure a fishier future for Fiji

15th October, 2013

In a world where fish catches are collapsing around the globe, Fijian fish are on the comeback trail thanks to a remarkable blend of centuries-old tradition and the latest science.Science and tradition secure a fishier future for Fiji

Corals ‘can fight acidifying oceans’

11th October, 2013

In a world-first, scientists from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (ARC CoE) have shown that tropical corals have the ability to fight back against acidifying oceans caused by human emissions of carbon dioxide.Corals ‘can fight acidifying oceans’

Seafood lovers ‘can help save our reefs’

10th October, 2013

Seafood consumption is a major driver of overfishing and destruction of reef communities globally - but there are some encouraging signs that consumers may be willing to eat more sustainably. These research outcomes will be presented by Dr Mike Fabinyi of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at the Coral Reefs in the 21st Century symposium in Townsville on Friday 11th October.Seafood lovers ‘can help save our reefs’

Exploring the future of our coral reefs

3rd October, 2013

The current condition and future prospects of the world’s coral reefs will be in the spotlight at a symposium of leading marine scientists in Townsville on 10-11 October 2013. Coral Reefs in the 21st Century will present the latest research, management and policy developments in coral reef systems in Australia, our region, and globally. It will feature talks by more than 30 eminent coral reef and fish scientists on these vital marine ecosystems.Exploring the future of our coral reefs

Study provides insights on protecting world’s poor from climate change

13th September, 2013

The worst impacts of climate change on the world’s poorest fishing communities can likely be avoided by careful management of the local environment and investing in the diversification of options for local people, according to research by an international team of researchers.Study provides insights on protecting world’s poor from climate change

Bringing corals back from the brink

2nd September, 2013

Shocks caused by climate and seasonal change could be used to aid recovery of some of the world’s badly-degraded coral reefs, an international team of scientists has proposed.Bringing corals back from the brink

Nemo can't go home

20th August, 2013

Research by an international team of marine scientists has found that sea anemones, which provide shelter for clownfish and 27 other fish species, are facing the same worldwide threat as coral reefs – bleaching and loss due to rising water temperatures.Nemo can’t go home

Tiny fish make ‘eyes’ at their killer

19th August, 2013

Small prey fish can grow a bigger ‘eye’ on their rear fins as a way of distracting predators and dramatically boosting their chances of survival, new scientific research has found.Tiny fish make ‘eyes’ at their killer

Barriers to fish evolution

14th August, 2013

Nemo may have found his way home, but when it comes to evolution, he and his friends encounter a whole different set of challenges. The challenges include hard and soft barriers, which affect the evolutionary path of coral reef fishes, according to Dr Peter Cowman.Barriers to fish evolution

Baby corals pass the acid test

13th August, 2013

Corals can survive the early stages of their development even under the tough conditions that rising carbon emissions will impose on them says a new study from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies.Baby corals pass the acid test

Climate 'causing huge changes in ocean life'

4th August, 2013

Profound changes are taking place in marine life around the planet in response to global warming, an international team of scientists has found.Climate ‘causing huge changes in ocean life’

Baby fish ‘steer by the sun'

8th July, 2013

A remarkable discovery by an international team of marine scientists has found that tiny fish, no more than a few millimetres in length, avoid getting lost and eaten in the vast ocean and navigate their way to safety using a ‘sun compass’.Baby fish ‘steer by the sun’

Jumping snails leap over global warming

5th July, 2013

A new study, to be presented at the Society for Experimental Biology meeting in Valencia on July 5, shows that the snails will indeed be able to keep on jumping, even at temperatures which will kill fish.Jumping snails leap over global warming

How coral cures your ills

1st July, 2013

A dramatic discovery by an Australian team of scientists has revealed that the ability of humans to resist bacterial diseases may go as far back in our ancestry as corals.How coral cures your ills

How fish won the oxygen war

17th June, 2013

A missing link in the story of how the fishes triumphed over toxic oceans and past climate changes has been revealed by an international team of scientists.How fish won the oxygen war

Hope for recovery of coral reefs devastated by cyclone Yasi

6th June, 2013

Coral reefs on the Great Barrier Reef devastated by cyclone Yasi were replenished by large numbers of coral larvae nine months after the cyclone. This finding by scientists at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (CoECRS) provides fresh hope for the ability of the world’s coral reefs to recover from destructive storms.Hope for recovery of coral reefs devastated by cyclone Yasi

Parasitised fish pick sides

5th June, 2013

Fish with parasites attached to their heads have a stronger preference for left or right when facing a T-intersection, giving them an edge when it comes to escaping predators, research from The Australian National University (ANU) has revealed.Parasitised fish pick sides

Deep refuge ‘can help save our reefs’

30th May, 2013

Marine scientists from Australia and the USA today called for global efforts to protect deeper coral reefs as insurance against the widespread destruction of shallow reefs and their fish stocks now taking place around the world.Deep refuge ‘can help save our reefs’

Coral reefs ‘ruled by earthquakes and volcanoes’

22nd May, 2013

Titanic forces in the Earth’s crust explain why the abundance and richness of corals varies dramatically across the vast expanse of the Indian and Pacific Oceans, a world-first study from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (CoECRS) has found.Coral reefs ‘ruled by earthquakes and volcanoes’

Coral reefs' collapse isn't inevitable, researchers say

10th May, 2013

Coral reefs are in decline, but their collapse can still be avoided with local and global action. That's according to findings reported in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on May 9th based on an analysis that combines the latest science on reef dynamics with the latest climate models.Coral reefs’ collapse isn’t inevitable, researchers say

Scientists call for large ocean wilderness parks

15th April, 2013

Leading international marine scientists have called for the protection of more, large marine wilderness areas in a bid to shield the world’s dwindling stocks of fish from destruction.Scientists call for large ocean wilderness parks

Remote reefs can be tougher than they look

5th April, 2013

Western Australia’s Scott Reef has recovered from mass bleaching in 1998. Isolated coral reefs can recover from catastrophic damage as effectively as those with nearby undisturbed neighbours, a long-term study by marine biologists has shown.Remote reefs can be tougher than they look

Community Power 'Can Rescue Failing Fish Stocks'

1st April, 2013

Traditional community-run marine reserves and fisheries can play a big role in helping to restore and maintain fish numbers in stressed developing nations’ coral reef fisheries.Community Power ‘Can Rescue Failing Fish Stocks’

Climate ‘brings opportunities and threats to the Pacific’

25th March, 2013

Climate change will bring both big opportunities and threats to the fish-dependent nations of the Pacific, international scientists say.Climate ‘brings opportunities and threats to the Pacific’

Tiny plants devour reefs in warming, acidic oceans

19th March, 2013

A world-first scientific study has found that, weakened by microscopic borers, the world’s coral reefs will erode more rapidly as the oceans warm and acidify.Tiny plants devour reefs in warming, acidic oceans

‘Blood Test’ for Crook Corals

27th February, 2013

Using a world-first scientific discovery, Australian researchers are developing a stress-test for coral, to measure how coral reefs are being impacted by pressures from climate change and human activity.‘Blood Test’ for Crook Corals

Nesting site protection ‘key to save turtles from climate change’

19th February, 2013

International marine scientists today warned it will be vital to protect key marine turtle nesting grounds and areas that may be suitable for turtle nesting in the future to ensure that the marine reptiles have a better chance of withstanding climate change.Nesting site protection ‘key to save turtles from climate change’

Crabs help reef fight deadly disease

4th February, 2013

A particular species of crab has been helping Great Barrier Reef coral combat white syndrome, a deadly disease that causes coral tissue to disintegrate.Crabs help reef fight deadly disease

Tiny reef speedster challenges tuna in the ocean sprint

14th January, 2013

Tiny coral reef wrasses can swim as fast as some of the swiftest fish in the ocean – but using only half as much energy to do so, Australian scientists working on the Great Barrier Reef have found.Tiny reef speedster challenges tuna in the ocean sprint

Ocean acidification upsets the acid-base balance of corals

10th January, 2013

Researchers in Monaco and Australia have solved a key part of the mystery surrounding why ocean acidification slows down the growth of reef-building corals.Ocean acidification upsets the acid-base balance of corals



Visit Complete News Archive >>

Comments are closed.