Seminars

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Ecological and morphological traits predict depth-generalist fishes on coral reefs

Seminar: Thursday 27th of August 2015 – 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. Dr Tom Bridge is a marine ecologist interested in how depth gradients structure marine communities. He is currently a joint-postdoc between the ARC Centre of Excellence and the Australian Institute of Marine Science.Ecological and morphological traits predict depth-generalist fishes on coral reefs

Uncovering bright spots among the world's coral reefs

Seminar: Thursday 30th of July 2015 – 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. Professor Josh Cinner’s research explores how social, economic, and cultural factors influence the ways in which people use, perceive, and govern natural resources. Josh holds an ARC Australian Research Fellowship and is a recipient of the 2015 Pew Fellowship in Marine Conservation.Uncovering bright spots among the world’s coral reefs

Does government effort align well with fishers’ intention?

Seminar: Wednesday 29th of July 2015; 13:00 to 14:00 hrs. Andrew Song is a Postdoctoral Fellow with the Sustainable Futures Research Laboratory in the Department of Natural Resource Sciences at McGill University. His current research focuses on the extent and the role of social capital in enhancing the trans-boundary governance of the Great Lakes fisheries.Does government effort align well with fishers’ intention?

Collaborative management of marine commons: opportunities and outcomes

Seminar: Tuesday 28th July 2015 – 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. Georgina’s research interests lie broadly in understanding the socioeconomic factors that influence opportunities for collaborative management of marine common-pool natural resources, and the multiple outcomes of such initiatives. She takes an interdisciplinary approach to her research, drawing on theories and methods from a range of disciplines including common-pool resource theory, social psychology, conservation planning, and behavioural economics.Collaborative management of marine commons: opportunities and outcomes

Ecosystem-based management in Norway: Pioneering implementation of regional-scale marine spatial planning

Seminar: Thursday 23rd of July 2015 – 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. Erik Olsen is a principal scientist at the Institute of Marine Research, in Bergen, Norway, where he has been working since 1999. He is currently on his way home to Norway after being seconded to NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, as a visiting scientist. He is now in Australia to continued his research on developing the science base, tools and methods for ecosystem-based management and marine spatial planning.Ecosystem-based management in Norway: Pioneering implementation of regional-scale marine spatial planning

Predicting evolutionary responses to climate change in the sea: progress and challenges

Seminar Thursday 16th of July 2015 – 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. Professor Philip Munday is an ARC Future Fellow in the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University. His research program focuses on predicting the impacts of climate change and ocean acidification on coral reef fishes, and testing their capacity to adapt to a rapidly changing environment.Predicting evolutionary responses to climate change in the sea: progress and challenges

Evolutionary origins of metazoan biomineralization: Insights from corals

Seminar Thursday 9th of July 2015 – 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. Mónica Medina is a comparative biologist whose research primarily focuses on the ecology and evolution of marine invertebrates.Evolutionary origins of metazoan biomineralization: Insights from corals

Making parks make a difference – biodiversity conservation will be more effective when protected-area impact is central to policy, planning, and management

Seminar Thursday 2nd of July 2015 – 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. Bob Pressey leads the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies' conservation planning group, with projects covering diverse topics and geographies, and aimed at influencing policy and practice for conservation.Making parks make a difference – biodiversity conservation will be more effective when protected-area impact is central to policy, planning, and management

Securing the Future of the Great Barrier Reef

Seminar Thursday 25th of June 2015 – 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. Distinguished Professor Terry Hughes is the Director of the Australian Research Council's Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, headquartered at James Cook University in Townsville. His research interests encompass coral reef ecology, macroecology and evolution, social-ecological systems and governance.Securing the Future of the Great Barrier Reef

Culture matters in the Great Barrier Reef

Seminar Monday 18th of June 2015 – 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. Dr. Nadine Marshall is a senior social scientist with CSIRO, Land and Water, based in Townsville, Australia. Her research focuses on the relationship between people and natural resources.Culture matters in the Great Barrier Reef

Understanding the causes of vulnerability to fishing in reef fishes that aggregate

Seminar: Tuesday 23rd of June 2015 – 12:00 to 13:00 hrs. Jan emigrated from the UK to the tropical paradise of Seychelles nearly 20 years ago. He worked in fisheries research and management for the Seychelles government and the Indian Ocean Tuna Commission, where he developed an interest in the implications of fish aggregating behaviour for population assessment and management. Jan has led research on reef fish spawning aggregations in Seychelles, Kenya and Tanzania, and is now a director of Science and Conservation of Fish Aggregations (SCRFA).Understanding the causes of vulnerability to fishing in reef fishes that aggregate

Protecting the unknown: what data for local coral reef conservation planning?

Seminar: Monday 15th of June 2015 – 12:00 to 13:00 hrs. Mélanie's thesis highlights the risk of using inadequate data to identify candidate protected areas: it can lead to a false sense of achievement of both conservation and socioeconomic objectives, ineffectively protecting biodiversity while incurring significant impacts on local communities. Her work also contributes to conservation planning theory and practice, by providing new methods for incorporating more relevant spatial socioeconomic information into reserve design in coral reef regions.Protecting the unknown: what data for local coral reef conservation planning?

Maternal stress in salmon: the poetry and the science

Seminar: Thursday 11th of June 2015 – 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. Natalie Sopinka will talk about the intergenerational effects of stress in Pacific salmon and the role that egg hormones play in shaping offspring.Maternal stress in salmon: the poetry and the science

Scales of connectivity in GBR reef sharks

Seminar: Thursday 4th of June 2015 – 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. Michelle Heupel is a Research Scientist at the Australian Institute of Marine Science and adjunct scientist in the College of Marine and Environmental Sciences at JCU. Michelle has studied the biology and ecology of sharks for over 20 years with her research program focussing largely on movement ecology. The aim of her research program is to provide science that helps produce effective conservation and management of marine predators.Scales of connectivity in GBR reef sharks

Improved understanding and mapping of bleaching sensitive reef locations on the Great Barrier Reef

Seminar: Thursday 28th of May 2015 – 16:00 to 17:00 hrs Dr Scott Wooldridge is an ecological modeller who has spent the last 15 years working at the Australian Institute of Marine Science investigating the cumulative impacts of multiple stressors on coral reef and seagrass ecosystems.Improved understanding and mapping of bleaching sensitive reef locations on the Great Barrier Reef

Understanding plasticity to future environmental change

Seminar: Wednesday 13th of May, 09:00 to 10:00 hrs. Jenni Donelson is currently a Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Fellow in the School of Life Sciences at the University of Technology Sydney. Her research focuses on the plasticity of fish in the face of changing environmental conditions. Specifically, on the capacity for developmental and transgenerational plasticity of reef fish to potentially enhance performance in future environments.Understanding plasticity to future environmental change

Corals in a perturbed world: adapt, acclimatize or re-assemble

Seminar: Tuesday 12th of May, 13:00 to 14:00 hrs. Greg Torda’s current research interest gravitates around the ecological, physiological and genetic bases of resilience of corals to stressors. He uses a variety of approaches, including state-of-the-art molecular techniques, controlled laboratory experiments, in situ field data collection and modelling to better understand the mechanisms that underpin the recovery of scleractinian populations from perturbations.Corals in a perturbed world: adapt, acclimatize or re-assemble

Responses of marine organisms to global change

Seminar: Tuesday 12th of May, 11:30 to 12:30 hrs. Sue-Ann Watson is a research associate at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University. Her research focuses on the ecological effects of global change, particularly ocean acidification, and evolutionary responses to environmental gradients in marine organisms.Responses of marine organisms to global change

The role of predation in population regulation of crown-of-thorns starfish (Acanthaster spp.)

PhD Confirmation Seminar: Thursday 30th of April 2015 – 12:00 to 13:00 hrs. Zara grew up in the UK and achieved her BSc (Hons) Biological Sciences at the University of Liverpool. Whilst diving in Thailand, Zara had her first encounter with a crown-of-thorns starfish (COTS) outbreak and was immediately interested in the causes of these outbreaks and their effects on coral reef communities. Supervised by Prof. Morgan Pratchett and Dr. Vanessa Messmer within the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, her PhD is looking at the role predation in population regulation of COTS.The role of predation in population regulation of crown-of-thorns starfish (Acanthaster spp.)

Scaling fish energetics from individuals to ecosystems

Seminar: Wednesday 6th of May 2015 – 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. Diego Barneche is passionate about making better use of mathematical, statistical and computational tools to develop predictive ecological theories, models and empirical tests. He is currently interested in explaining mechanistically how individual-level determinants of metabolism affect the energy flux and productivity of populations, communities and ecosystems across the world's oceans.Scaling fish energetics from individuals to ecosystems

Evolution on coral reefs: biodiversity patterns and ancestral biogeography

Interview Seminar: Tuesday 5th of May 2015 – 09:30 to 10:30 hrs. Peter's work on the phylogenetic reconstruction of diverse reef fish families has provided a framework which has allowed him to explore patterns of origination, trophic evolution and ancestral biogeography across the global tropics. His work has highlighted the importance of coral reef association in the diversification of associated fish lineages and its potential to act as a refuge from extinction.Evolution on coral reefs: biodiversity patterns and ancestral biogeography

What are the effects of dredging on the Great Barrier Reef? A synthesis by an independent panel of experts

Seminar: Thursday 30th of April, 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. Laurence McCook works in science-based management of marine ecosystems, especially coral reefs. For the last 11 years, Laurence worked at the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, with the aim of ensuring the management of the Great Barrier Reef is based on the best available scientific information, in the face of increasing, cumulative impacts, ecosystem declines and climate change. To watch video click here...What are the effects of dredging on the Great Barrier Reef? A synthesis by an independent panel of experts

“400 miles from Darwin” : Coastal Fisheries and Food Security in Post-Conflict Timor-Leste

Seminar: Thursday 23rd April, 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. David Mills has worked on diverse projects relating to fisheries information systems, governance, fisheries and food security, and aquaculture development. He has worked on projects in Indonesia, Vietnam, Philippines, Senegal, Nigeria, Ghana and Solomon Islands.“400 miles from Darwin” : Coastal Fisheries and Food Security in Post-Conflict Timor-Leste

Macroalgal-driven feedbacks and the dynamics of coral reefs

Seminar: Wednesday 22nd of April 2015 – 11:00 to 12:00 hrs. Dr Andrew Hoey is a Senior Research Fellow in the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University. His research focuses on understanding the functional importance of different taxa to the resilience of coral reef ecosystems, the differential responses of fishes to changes in the benthic structure of coral reef habitats, and the relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem function.Macroalgal-driven feedbacks and the dynamics of coral reefs

Physiological impacts of ocean acidification on marine fish

Seminar: Thursday 2nd of April 2015 – 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. Dr. Grosell is a Maytag professor of ichthyology with specialty in environmental physiology and toxicology at the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (RSMAS) in the Department of Marine Biology and Ecology. His areas of expertise include trace metal homeostasis and toxicity, oil and PAH toxicity, respiratory gas exchange, cardiovascular physiology, acid-base balance, and osmoregulation in reptiles, fish and invertebrates. Rachael Heuer is a PhD student interested in interested in how ocean acidification affects acid-base balance in marine fish.Physiological impacts of ocean acidification on marine fish

Research data and its role in your future career

Seminar: Thursday 9th of April 2015 – 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. Adjunct Professor Nick Oliver is currently working with the JCU eResearch Centre to encourage researchers to consider data storage and management for the future. This talk and discussion session is intended to brief the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies and other JCU marine science researchers on the likely future of data management and how it will impact on your research career. Because it will.Research data and its role in your future career

Citizen science meets research and conservation: the good, the bad and downright ugly

Seminar: Thursday 2nd of April 2015 – 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. Dr Andrew Chin has worked in marine research since the 1990s. Starting at the Australian Institute of Marine Science, Andrew then spent ten years working at the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA). Since moving to James Cook University in 2008, Andrew's research has focused on coastal ecology and fisheries, particularly sharks and rays in the Pacific regionCitizen science meets research and conservation: the good, the bad and downright ugly

PhD Mid-Candidature - Ciemon Caballes

Outbreaks of the crown-of-thorns starfish, Acanthaster planci, represent one of the most significant biological disturbances on coral reefs and remain one of the principal causes of widespread decline in live coral cover in Indo-Pacific reefs. This seminar will discuss the environmental constraints that could limit fertilization rates in A. planci and the interactive effects of high nutrient levels and low salinity on larval survival, growth, and development.PhD Mid-Candidature – Ciemon Caballes

Wellbeing, Life Satisfaction and the economic ‘value’ of ecosystem services

Seminar: Thursday 18th of March 2015 – 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. Professor Natalie Stoeckl has a BEc from the Australian National University (ANU), a MEc from JCU and a PhD from ANU. She is particularly interested in the environmental and distributional/equity issues associated with economic growth in rural / remote locations. Although fully ‘schooled’ in mainstream neoclassical economics, she feels most at home when working in multidisciplinary teams, and thinks of herself as an almost ‘lapsed’ (or at least heterodox) economist.Wellbeing, Life Satisfaction and the economic ‘value’ of ecosystem services

PhD Pre-Completion Seminar - Georgina Gurney

Protected areas (PAs) are a key strategy employed worldwide to maintain marine ecosystem services and mitigate biodiversity loss. However, the efficacy of PAs in achieving biological and socioeconomic goals is highly variable; a significant factor impeding their success is a lack of consideration and understanding of associated human systems. Therefore, the broad goal of my thesis was to investigate how socioeconomic factors can be incorporated into the design and management of PAs, which I addressed through three specific objectives.PhD Pre-Completion Seminar – Georgina Gurney

On the application of theories of judgement and decision making to the human dimensions of environmental change

Seminar: Wednesday 11th of March, 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. Terre Satterfield is an interdisciplinary social scientist; professor of culture, risk and the environment; and director (on leave 2014-2015) of the University of British Columbia’s Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability. Her research concerns human behaviour in the context of risk assessment, environmental policy and decision-making.On the application of theories of judgement and decision making to the human dimensions of environmental change

What good(s) are ecosystem services?

Seminar: Thursday 5th of March 2015 - 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. Prof Katrina Brown is Professor of Social Sciences at the Environment and Sustainability Institute at University of Exeter, UK. Her research focuses on vulnerability, adaptation and resilience, and ecosystem services and poverty alleviation.What good(s) are ecosystem services?

The tropicalization of temperate reef fish communities

Seminar: Thursday 26th of February 2015 - 13:00 to 14:00 hrs. Emanuel Gonçalves is Associate Professor at ISPA – Instituto Universitário (Portugal). His research interests are marine conservation (in particular the role of marine protected areas for ocean governance), marine ecology and connectivity in marine ecosystems, behaviour of marine animals, in particular fish, larval ecology and recruitment.The tropicalization of temperate reef fish communities

Ecosystem services and dimensions of well-being in deltas

Seminar: Thursday 19th of February 2015 - 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. Prof Neil Adger is a Professor of Human Geography at the University of Exeter, UK. He researches social dimensions of environmental change. He was an author on the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment and on reports of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. He is presently a Distinguished Visiting Scientist at CSIRO in Townsville working with the Resource Governance group.Ecosystem services and dimensions of well-being in deltas

Predicting climate-driven regime shifts versus rebound potential in coral reefs

WHEN: Thursday 12th of February 2015 - 16:00 to 17:00 hrs - Building 19 (Kevin Stark Research Building) Room #106 (upstairs), JCU, Townsville - Dr Nick Graham, ARC CoE for Coral Reef Studies. Conditions under which reefs bounce back from bleaching events or shift from coral to algal dominance are unknown, making it difficult to predict and plan for differing reef responses under climate change.Predicting climate-driven regime shifts versus rebound potential in coral reefs

Social-Ecological Linkages: an Integrative Systems Approach to Marine and Coastal Governance

12:00pm-1:00pm, Monday 2nd February 2015, Room 106, Building 19 (Kevin Stark Research Building), JCU, Townsville. Michele Barnes-Mauthe ARC CoE for Coral Reef Studies. Considering the scale of anthropogenic stress on the global oceans, we must have a strong understanding of the linkages and feedbacks between people and the marine environment in order to develop viable strategies to advance global sustainability and meet conservation goals.Social-Ecological Linkages: an Integrative Systems Approach to Marine and Coastal Governance

Using gene expression data to understand evolution and developmental mechanisms in calcareous sponges

WHEN: Monday 15th December 2014, 13.00 - 14.00 hrs, Building 19 (Kevin Stark Research Building) Room 106, JCU, Townsville - Sofia Fortunato, Sars Centre of Marine Molecular Biology, Bergen, Norway. Whole-genome sequencing of the local sponge Amphimedon queenslandica (class Demospongia) demonstrated that sponges have a limited repertoire of developmental transcription factors subfamilies in comparison to cnidarians and bilaterians.Using gene expression data to understand evolution and developmental mechanisms in calcareous sponges

Plasticity of reef fish to future environmental change

WHEN: Monday 15th December 2014, 11.00 - 12.00 hrs, Building 19 (Kevin Stark Research Building) Room 106, JCU, Townsville - Jenni Donelson, School of the Environment at the University of Technology, Sydney. An understanding of the capacity for species to acclimate and adapt to rapid climate change is critical for effective management and conservation of ecosystems in the future.Plasticity of reef fish to future environmental change

Responses of marine organisms to rising CO2

WHEN: Friday 12th December 2014, 13:30 - 14.30 hrs, Building 19 (Kevin Stark Research Building) Room 106, JCU, Townsville - Sue-Ann Watson, ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies. Global change, including ocean acidification, poses a serious threat to marine life. Ocean chemistry is changing 100 times faster than any period in the last 650,000 years and the oceans are already 30 % more acidic than 250 years ago. The effects of ocean acidification include reductions in growth, and altered developmental and physiological processes in marine organisms.Responses of marine organisms to rising CO2

The molecular, cellular and microbial responses of the coral holobiont to environmental change

11:00am-12:00pm, Friday 12th December 2014, Room 106, Building 19 (Kevin Stark Research Building), JCU, Townsville. Tracy Ainsworth ARC CoE for Coral Reef Studies. Globally sea surface temperatures (SST) have risen 0.6 °C are forecast to continue to rise rapidly within the next 80 years. Models predict that as a result on increasing SST tropical coral reefs will reach annual bleaching thresholds over the coming decades.The molecular, cellular and microbial responses of the coral holobiont to environmental change



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