Seminars

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Performance of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park since the 2004 re-zoning

Seminar - Thursday 25th February 2016 – 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. Networks of no-take marine reserves (NTMRs) are widely advocated for preserving exploited fish stocks and for conserving biodiversity. We used underwater visual survey data of coral reef fish and benthic communities to quantify the short- to medium-term (5 to 30 years) ecological effects of the establishment of NTMRs within the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park (GBRMP). The density, mean length and biomass of principal fishery species, coral trout (Plectropomus spp.), were consistently greater in NTMRs than on fished reefs over both the short- and medium-term.Performance of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park since the 2004 re-zoning

Combining high-resolution ocean modelling and graph theory tools to estimate marine connectivity in the Great Barrier Reef

Seminar - Thursday 21st January 2016 – 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. High-resolution ocean circulation models are required to simulate the complex and multi-scale currents that drive physical connectivity between marine ecosystems. However, standard coastal ocean models rarely achieve a spatial resolution of less than 1km over the >100km spatial scale of dispersion processes.Combining high-resolution ocean modelling and graph theory tools to estimate marine connectivity in the Great Barrier Reef

Avoiding and reversing “paper parks”: integrating fishers’ compliance into conservation efforts

PhD Pre-Completion Seminar - Friday 11th December 2015 – 12:00 to 13:00 hrs. Adrian Arias. Adrian’s project looks into compliance as related to conservation. Conservation is inherently about influencing peoples’ behaviour towards nature; therefore users’ compliance is critical for effective conservation. Adrian focuses on understanding and managing fishers’ compliance with marine protected areas.Avoiding and reversing “paper parks”: integrating fishers’ compliance into conservation efforts

Prevalence of poaching by recreational fishers in the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park

PhD Mid-Candidature Seminar - Tuesday 8th December 2015 – 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. Brock Bergseth. Effective marine conservation is dependent upon peoples’ compliance with rules and regulations, yet non-compliance is more often the rule than the exception. Although multi-disciplinary approaches are demonstrably critical for understanding compliance, few studies have used mixed-methods approaches to examine compliance.Prevalence of poaching by recreational fishers in the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park

Climate Risk, Governance and Conflicting Temporalities: A Comparative Study of Australia, China and the UK

Seminar - Thursday 3rd December 2015 – 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. Catherine Wong. While consensus on the science of anthropogenic climate change is largely well established, how best to deal with it is still hotly contested. Different countries face varied climate risks and, therefore, have different priorities. But there are also significant common major risks that have prompted key polluting countries to pursue similar policy and market instruments.Climate Risk, Governance and Conflicting Temporalities: A Comparative Study of Australia, China and the UK

Congruent patterns of connectivity can inform management for broadcast spawning corals on the Great Barrier Reef

Seminar - Thursday 26th November 2015 – 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. Vimoksalehi Lukoschek. Connectivity underpins the persistence and recovery of marine ecosystems. The Great Barrier Reef (GBR) is the world’s largest coral reef ecosystem and managed by an extensive network of no-take zones, however information about connectivity was not available to optimise the network’s configuration.Congruent patterns of connectivity can inform management for broadcast spawning corals on the Great Barrier Reef

Re-animating Indigenous knowledge: decolonizing transformative environmental governance

Seminar - Wednesday 25th November 2015 – 15:00 to 16:00 hrs. Julian Yates. Indigenous knowledges remain on the fringe of policy and practice in environmental governance. Often conceptualized as “Traditional Ecological Knowledge”, the environmental knowledges and practices of Indigenous peoples have frequently been incorporated only instrumentally within development interventions, conservation programmes, and co-management plans.Re-animating Indigenous knowledge:  decolonizing transformative environmental governance

The structural, environmental and trophic influences on a rapidly changing marine system: the Baltic Sea

Seminar - Thursday 19th November 2015 – 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. Stuart Kininmonth. The management of the Baltic fisheries has previously focused on dynamics that are limited in terms of spatial and temporal interactions. Research suggests that the interaction between habitat and trophic interactions combined with environmental influences are required. Using a data driven approach within a Bayesian network model our research has been able to highlight the complex situation in the Baltic Sea.The structural, environmental and trophic influences on a rapidly changing marine system: the Baltic Sea

Spatial and temporal variation in the growth of branching corals

Pre-Completion Seminar - Tuesday 17th November 2015 - 12:00 to 13:00 hrs. Kristen Anderson. Branching corals are a critical component of coral reef ecosystems for habitat, shelter and reef growth. The purpose of this study was to investigate the growth of important habitat-forming corals (e.g., Acropora muricata, Pocillopora damicornis, Isopora cuneata), at a range of locations along the east coast of Australia, taking advantage of locations where prior measurements of coral growth have been conducted...Spatial and temporal variation in the growth of branching corals

Linking ecological roles to trophic resources on coral reefs: parrotfishes revisited

Seminar: Thursday 29th of October 2015 – 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. JH Choat, now retired and from an adjunct appointment, is continuing studies of the demography and nutritional ecology of parrot fishes at several sites including the east Pacific, southern Brazil, the Red Sea and Oman, Cocos-Keeling the Solomon Islands, Micronesia and the GBR.Linking ecological roles to trophic resources on coral reefs: parrotfishes revisited

Learning to 'Shoot in the Dark’: The promise, potential and pitfalls of impact evaluation in the conservation sector.

SEMINAR Thursday 20th of October 2015 – 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. Louise Glew, Ph.D., is the Lead Scientist for Monitoring and Evaluation at World Wildlife Fund (US), where she manages WWF’s monitoring and evaluation portfolio. Louise’s research focuses on understanding the social and ecological impacts of conservation interventions in complex social-ecological systems.Learning to ‘Shoot in the Dark’:  The promise, potential and pitfalls of impact evaluation in the conservation sector.

Equality, gender and change in social-ecological systems

SEMINAR Thursday 15th of October 2015 – 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. Dr Pip Cohen is a scientist for WorldFish, and is an Adjunct Research Fellow at the Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University. Pip’s research largely focuses on understanding the influence of culture, leadership, social networks, demography, economic development, and policy on the governance of social-ecological systems.Equality, gender and change in social-ecological systems

Advancing conservation planning for persistence

PhD Pre-completion Seminar: Friday 25th of September, 12:00 to 13:00 hrs. Rafael is a PhD candidate in the ARC Centre of Excellence of Coral Reef Studies, investigating better ways of designing functional networks of marine reserves.Advancing conservation planning for persistence

Winners are grinners: a collection of sea turtle tales

Seminar: Thursday 27th of August 2015 – 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. Associate Professor Mark Hamann is a researcher and lecturer in his 10th year at JCU. His research focuses on marine turtle biology and behavior.Winners are grinners: a collection of sea turtle tales

Ecological and morphological traits predict depth-generalist fishes on coral reefs

Seminar: Thursday 27th of August 2015 – 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. Dr Tom Bridge is a marine ecologist interested in how depth gradients structure marine communities. He is currently a joint-postdoc between the ARC Centre of Excellence and the Australian Institute of Marine Science.Ecological and morphological traits predict depth-generalist fishes on coral reefs

Uncovering bright spots among the world's coral reefs

Seminar: Thursday 30th of July 2015 – 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. Professor Josh Cinner’s research explores how social, economic, and cultural factors influence the ways in which people use, perceive, and govern natural resources. Josh holds an ARC Australian Research Fellowship and is a recipient of the 2015 Pew Fellowship in Marine Conservation.Uncovering bright spots among the world’s coral reefs

Does government effort align well with fishers’ intention?

Seminar: Wednesday 29th of July 2015; 13:00 to 14:00 hrs. Andrew Song is a Postdoctoral Fellow with the Sustainable Futures Research Laboratory in the Department of Natural Resource Sciences at McGill University. His current research focuses on the extent and the role of social capital in enhancing the trans-boundary governance of the Great Lakes fisheries.Does government effort align well with fishers’ intention?

Collaborative management of marine commons: opportunities and outcomes

Seminar: Tuesday 28th July 2015 – 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. Georgina’s research interests lie broadly in understanding the socioeconomic factors that influence opportunities for collaborative management of marine common-pool natural resources, and the multiple outcomes of such initiatives. She takes an interdisciplinary approach to her research, drawing on theories and methods from a range of disciplines including common-pool resource theory, social psychology, conservation planning, and behavioural economics.Collaborative management of marine commons: opportunities and outcomes

Ecosystem-based management in Norway: Pioneering implementation of regional-scale marine spatial planning

Seminar: Thursday 23rd of July 2015 – 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. Erik Olsen is a principal scientist at the Institute of Marine Research, in Bergen, Norway, where he has been working since 1999. He is currently on his way home to Norway after being seconded to NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, as a visiting scientist. He is now in Australia to continued his research on developing the science base, tools and methods for ecosystem-based management and marine spatial planning.Ecosystem-based management in Norway: Pioneering implementation of regional-scale marine spatial planning

Predicting evolutionary responses to climate change in the sea: progress and challenges

Seminar Thursday 16th of July 2015 – 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. Professor Philip Munday is an ARC Future Fellow in the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University. His research program focuses on predicting the impacts of climate change and ocean acidification on coral reef fishes, and testing their capacity to adapt to a rapidly changing environment.Predicting evolutionary responses to climate change in the sea: progress and challenges

Evolutionary origins of metazoan biomineralization: Insights from corals

Seminar Thursday 9th of July 2015 – 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. Mónica Medina is a comparative biologist whose research primarily focuses on the ecology and evolution of marine invertebrates.Evolutionary origins of metazoan biomineralization: Insights from corals

Making parks make a difference – biodiversity conservation will be more effective when protected-area impact is central to policy, planning, and management

Seminar Thursday 2nd of July 2015 – 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. Bob Pressey leads the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies' conservation planning group, with projects covering diverse topics and geographies, and aimed at influencing policy and practice for conservation.Making parks make a difference – biodiversity conservation will be more effective when protected-area impact is central to policy, planning, and management

Securing the Future of the Great Barrier Reef

Seminar Thursday 25th of June 2015 – 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. Distinguished Professor Terry Hughes is the Director of the Australian Research Council's Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, headquartered at James Cook University in Townsville. His research interests encompass coral reef ecology, macroecology and evolution, social-ecological systems and governance.Securing the Future of the Great Barrier Reef

Culture matters in the Great Barrier Reef

Seminar Monday 18th of June 2015 – 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. Dr. Nadine Marshall is a senior social scientist with CSIRO, Land and Water, based in Townsville, Australia. Her research focuses on the relationship between people and natural resources.Culture matters in the Great Barrier Reef

Understanding the causes of vulnerability to fishing in reef fishes that aggregate

Seminar: Tuesday 23rd of June 2015 – 12:00 to 13:00 hrs. Jan emigrated from the UK to the tropical paradise of Seychelles nearly 20 years ago. He worked in fisheries research and management for the Seychelles government and the Indian Ocean Tuna Commission, where he developed an interest in the implications of fish aggregating behaviour for population assessment and management. Jan has led research on reef fish spawning aggregations in Seychelles, Kenya and Tanzania, and is now a director of Science and Conservation of Fish Aggregations (SCRFA).Understanding the causes of vulnerability to fishing in reef fishes that aggregate

Protecting the unknown: what data for local coral reef conservation planning?

Seminar: Monday 15th of June 2015 – 12:00 to 13:00 hrs. Mélanie's thesis highlights the risk of using inadequate data to identify candidate protected areas: it can lead to a false sense of achievement of both conservation and socioeconomic objectives, ineffectively protecting biodiversity while incurring significant impacts on local communities. Her work also contributes to conservation planning theory and practice, by providing new methods for incorporating more relevant spatial socioeconomic information into reserve design in coral reef regions.Protecting the unknown: what data for local coral reef conservation planning?

Maternal stress in salmon: the poetry and the science

Seminar: Thursday 11th of June 2015 – 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. Natalie Sopinka will talk about the intergenerational effects of stress in Pacific salmon and the role that egg hormones play in shaping offspring.Maternal stress in salmon: the poetry and the science

Scales of connectivity in GBR reef sharks

Seminar: Thursday 4th of June 2015 – 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. Michelle Heupel is a Research Scientist at the Australian Institute of Marine Science and adjunct scientist in the College of Marine and Environmental Sciences at JCU. Michelle has studied the biology and ecology of sharks for over 20 years with her research program focussing largely on movement ecology. The aim of her research program is to provide science that helps produce effective conservation and management of marine predators.Scales of connectivity in GBR reef sharks

Improved understanding and mapping of bleaching sensitive reef locations on the Great Barrier Reef

Seminar: Thursday 28th of May 2015 – 16:00 to 17:00 hrs Dr Scott Wooldridge is an ecological modeller who has spent the last 15 years working at the Australian Institute of Marine Science investigating the cumulative impacts of multiple stressors on coral reef and seagrass ecosystems.Improved understanding and mapping of bleaching sensitive reef locations on the Great Barrier Reef

Understanding plasticity to future environmental change

Seminar: Wednesday 13th of May, 09:00 to 10:00 hrs. Jenni Donelson is currently a Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Fellow in the School of Life Sciences at the University of Technology Sydney. Her research focuses on the plasticity of fish in the face of changing environmental conditions. Specifically, on the capacity for developmental and transgenerational plasticity of reef fish to potentially enhance performance in future environments.Understanding plasticity to future environmental change

Corals in a perturbed world: adapt, acclimatize or re-assemble

Seminar: Tuesday 12th of May, 13:00 to 14:00 hrs. Greg Torda’s current research interest gravitates around the ecological, physiological and genetic bases of resilience of corals to stressors. He uses a variety of approaches, including state-of-the-art molecular techniques, controlled laboratory experiments, in situ field data collection and modelling to better understand the mechanisms that underpin the recovery of scleractinian populations from perturbations.Corals in a perturbed world: adapt, acclimatize or re-assemble

Responses of marine organisms to global change

Seminar: Tuesday 12th of May, 11:30 to 12:30 hrs. Sue-Ann Watson is a research associate at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University. Her research focuses on the ecological effects of global change, particularly ocean acidification, and evolutionary responses to environmental gradients in marine organisms.Responses of marine organisms to global change

The role of predation in population regulation of crown-of-thorns starfish (Acanthaster spp.)

PhD Confirmation Seminar: Thursday 30th of April 2015 – 12:00 to 13:00 hrs. Zara grew up in the UK and achieved her BSc (Hons) Biological Sciences at the University of Liverpool. Whilst diving in Thailand, Zara had her first encounter with a crown-of-thorns starfish (COTS) outbreak and was immediately interested in the causes of these outbreaks and their effects on coral reef communities. Supervised by Prof. Morgan Pratchett and Dr. Vanessa Messmer within the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, her PhD is looking at the role predation in population regulation of COTS.The role of predation in population regulation of crown-of-thorns starfish (Acanthaster spp.)

Scaling fish energetics from individuals to ecosystems

Seminar: Wednesday 6th of May 2015 – 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. Diego Barneche is passionate about making better use of mathematical, statistical and computational tools to develop predictive ecological theories, models and empirical tests. He is currently interested in explaining mechanistically how individual-level determinants of metabolism affect the energy flux and productivity of populations, communities and ecosystems across the world's oceans.Scaling fish energetics from individuals to ecosystems

Evolution on coral reefs: biodiversity patterns and ancestral biogeography

Interview Seminar: Tuesday 5th of May 2015 – 09:30 to 10:30 hrs. Peter's work on the phylogenetic reconstruction of diverse reef fish families has provided a framework which has allowed him to explore patterns of origination, trophic evolution and ancestral biogeography across the global tropics. His work has highlighted the importance of coral reef association in the diversification of associated fish lineages and its potential to act as a refuge from extinction.Evolution on coral reefs: biodiversity patterns and ancestral biogeography

What are the effects of dredging on the Great Barrier Reef? A synthesis by an independent panel of experts

Seminar: Thursday 30th of April, 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. Laurence McCook works in science-based management of marine ecosystems, especially coral reefs. For the last 11 years, Laurence worked at the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, with the aim of ensuring the management of the Great Barrier Reef is based on the best available scientific information, in the face of increasing, cumulative impacts, ecosystem declines and climate change. To watch video click here...What are the effects of dredging on the Great Barrier Reef? A synthesis by an independent panel of experts

“400 miles from Darwin” : Coastal Fisheries and Food Security in Post-Conflict Timor-Leste

Seminar: Thursday 23rd April, 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. David Mills has worked on diverse projects relating to fisheries information systems, governance, fisheries and food security, and aquaculture development. He has worked on projects in Indonesia, Vietnam, Philippines, Senegal, Nigeria, Ghana and Solomon Islands.“400 miles from Darwin” : Coastal Fisheries and Food Security in Post-Conflict Timor-Leste

Macroalgal-driven feedbacks and the dynamics of coral reefs

Seminar: Wednesday 22nd of April 2015 – 11:00 to 12:00 hrs. Dr Andrew Hoey is a Senior Research Fellow in the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University. His research focuses on understanding the functional importance of different taxa to the resilience of coral reef ecosystems, the differential responses of fishes to changes in the benthic structure of coral reef habitats, and the relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem function.Macroalgal-driven feedbacks and the dynamics of coral reefs

Physiological impacts of ocean acidification on marine fish

Seminar: Thursday 2nd of April 2015 – 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. Dr. Grosell is a Maytag professor of ichthyology with specialty in environmental physiology and toxicology at the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (RSMAS) in the Department of Marine Biology and Ecology. His areas of expertise include trace metal homeostasis and toxicity, oil and PAH toxicity, respiratory gas exchange, cardiovascular physiology, acid-base balance, and osmoregulation in reptiles, fish and invertebrates. Rachael Heuer is a PhD student interested in interested in how ocean acidification affects acid-base balance in marine fish.Physiological impacts of ocean acidification on marine fish

Research data and its role in your future career

Seminar: Thursday 9th of April 2015 – 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. Adjunct Professor Nick Oliver is currently working with the JCU eResearch Centre to encourage researchers to consider data storage and management for the future. This talk and discussion session is intended to brief the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies and other JCU marine science researchers on the likely future of data management and how it will impact on your research career. Because it will.Research data and its role in your future career



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