Seminars

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Resource limitation in reef fish communities: a macroecological approach

WHEN: Wednesday 16th of April 2014; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - Richard Taylor, University of Auckland’s Leigh Marine Laboratory, New Zealand. Richard will present global patterns in the abundance, biomass and species richness of reef fishes, using Reef Life Survey data from 1,825 sites in 11 biogeographic realms.Resource limitation in reef fish communities: a macroecological approach

Game theory in conservation: strengths and limitations

WHEN: Thursday 10th of April 2014; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - Michael Bode, School of Botany, University of Melbourne. Conservation involves multiple actors. The theory of interactive decision making – game theory – can offer useful insights into conservation dynamics, and frame critiques of optimal organisation behaviour and structure.Game theory in conservation: strengths and limitations

Fear and longing: Predator change and the role of behavior in marine conservation

WHEN: Thursday 27th of March 2014; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - Robert Warner, Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Marine Biology at the University of California, Santa Barbara. In marine systems, many of the spatial and temporal changes in predator numbers - both increases and decreases - are human-induced. These changes are occurring at scales ranging from global to local. Indirect effects are known to be important in structuring ecosystems.Fear and longing: Predator change and the role of behavior in marine conservation

Quantifying shifts in community composition and structural complexity using 3D models

WHEN: Thursday 20th of March 2014; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - Tom Bridge, ARC Centre of Excellence for Disturbances on coral reefs may cause changes in both the composition of ecological communities and topographic complexity of the reef structures themselves. The increasing frequency and severity of disturbances in recent decades has resulted in declines in both structural complexity and coral abundance and diversity, which in turn influences other coral-dependent taxa such as fishes and mobile invertebrates.Quantifying shifts in community composition and structural complexity using 3D models

Assessment of scale dependent function in reef fish, and its application to the evaluation of coral reef resilience

WHEN: Thursday 13th of March 2014; 10:00 to 11:00 hrs - Kirsty Nash, ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies. The functional roles played by fish have been identified as critical for supporting the resilience of reefs within a coral-dominated state. However, research to date suggests that measures such as functional diversity or biomass of functional groups may not be directly related to ecosystem impact, due to spatial and ontogenetic changes in function.Assessment of scale dependent function in reef fish, and its application to the evaluation of coral reef resilience

Climate Change and Genetic Structure of Leading Edge and Rear End Populations in a Northwards Shifting Marine Fish Species, the Corkwing Wrasse (Symphodus melops)

WHEN: Thursday 20th of February 2014; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - Halvor Knusten, Institute of Marine Research (IMR), Flødevigen Marine Research Station, Norway. Long-distance dispersal may be severely limited in the corkwing wrasse, and successful range-shifts following present climate change may be problematic for this and other species with limited dispersal abilities, even in the seemingly continuous marine environment.Climate Change and Genetic Structure of Leading Edge and Rear End Populations in a Northwards Shifting Marine Fish Species, the Corkwing Wrasse (Symphodus melops)

Double jeopardy and extinction risk in corals and reef fish

WHEN: Thursday 12th of December 2013; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - Professor Terry Hughes, ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville. Professor Terry Hughes will close our 2013 seminar series by presenting the work he conducted with Prof. David Bellwood and Prof. Sean Connoly.Double jeopardy and extinction risk in corals and reef fish

Local adaptation in a Caribbean coral is associated with gene expression plasticity

WHEN: Monday 9th of December 2013; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - Carly Kenkel, Department of Integrative Biology, The University of Texas at Austin, US. Local adaptation in a Caribbean coral is associated with gene expression plasticityLocal adaptation in a Caribbean coral is associated with gene expression plasticity

Long Term Monitoring on the Great Barrier Reef – including people in the equation

WHEN: Thursday 5th of December 2013; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - Renae Tobin, Centre for Sustainable Tropical Fisheries and Aquaculture and the School of Earth and Environmental Science, James Cook University, Townsville. Renae will present the work undertaken by the Social and Economic Long Term Monitoring Program (SELTMP) that is attempting to fill the current void in cross-sector social and economic data, to help ensure the inclusion of the social dimensions of the Great Barrier Reef in its management.Long Term Monitoring on the Great Barrier Reef – including people in the equation

Hunting for herpetofauna in the Western Ghats: a Wallacean approach to discovering diversity

WHEN: Wednesday 4th of December 2013; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - Kartik Shanker, Centre for Ecological Sciences, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore. In his seminar, Kartik will tackle the long-standing ecology and evolutionary pursuit of describing diversity using a grid based approach. This incorporates biogeography, morphological and molecular data on frogs, lizards and snakes of Western Ghats in India.Hunting for herpetofauna in the Western Ghats: a Wallacean approach to discovering diversity

Whether, why and how pair bonding exists in a family of lower vertebrate, the Chaetodontidae

WHEN: Tuesday, 26th of November 2013; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - Jessica Nowicki, ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies. Jess will be presenting her confirmation seminar for her PhD on pair bonding. She will show us how she intends to fill the knowledge gap of occurrence, adaptive significance and neurobiology of pair bonding using butterflyfish as a model species.Whether, why and how pair bonding exists in a family of lower vertebrate, the Chaetodontidae

Scaling up to form marine protected area networks: the role of coordination of initiatives and institutional collaborations in the Philippines

WHEN: Friday, 22nd of November 2013; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - Vera Horigue, ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies. Vera will present the results of her PhD on MPA management in the Philippines and in particular she will 1) describe the role of institutional collaborations in scaling up to form networks; 2) determine the benefits of scaling up to form networks; 3) evaluate the management performance of these networks; and 4) identify and examine the factors that influence the management performance of networksScaling up to form marine protected area networks: the role of coordination of initiatives and institutional collaborations in the Philippines

PLANNING AND MANAGING THE GREAT BARRIER REEF: lessons learnt for the future planning of the Reef and implications for MPAs elsewhere

WHEN: Monday, 18th of November 2013; 15:00 to 16:00 hrs - Jon Day, ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies. Jon will be presenting his PhD proposal on analysing the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park rezoning process and the lessons drawn from it to formulate implications and more effective management of Marine Protected Areas.PLANNING AND MANAGING THE GREAT BARRIER REEF: lessons learnt for the future planning of the Reef and implications for MPAs elsewhere

Prioritising multiple management actions for marine turtle conservation

WHEN: Thursday, 14th of November 2013; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - Dr Mariana Fuentes, ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies. In this talk, Mariana will discuss the complexities and approaches undertaken to prioritise marine turtle management under different contexts and locations. She will first present a novel framework to explicitly prioritise conservation actions and then introduce a new project that she is involved with in Brasil.Prioritising multiple management actions for marine turtle conservation

Global ecology and biogeography of reef fishes

WHEN: Monday, 11th of November 2013; 13:00 to 14:00 hrs - Dr Valeriano Parravicini, IRD, Institut de Recherche pour le Développement, Banyul sur mer, France. In this talk, Valeriano will show the results of a project on the global ecology and biogeography of reef fishes. The project allowed for the compilation of two extensive global databases, the first on the geographical distribution of 6,316 reef fishes and the second comprising abundance information from about 10,000 transects across the world.Global ecology and biogeography of reef fishes

Ecological processes on disturbed coral reefs and implications for reef recovery

WHEN: Friday, 8th of November 2013; 11:00 to 12:00 hrs - Karen Chong-Seng, ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies. Karen will present the work she conducted during her PhD. Her aim is to use the extensive variability in reef condition that exists on reefs of the inner Seychelles islands to understand the role of communities shaping key ecological reef processes.Ecological processes on disturbed coral reefs and implications for reef recovery

Confirmation seminar: Coral reef mesopredator trophodynamics in response to reef condition

WHEN: Tuesday, 29th of October 2013; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - Tessa Hempson, ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies. Tessa will present the work she has planned to conduct for her PhD on the key implications of habitat degradation for mesopredators and their role in coral reef trophodynamics.Confirmation seminar: Coral reef mesopredator trophodynamics in response to reef condition

Climate change refugia for terrestrial biodiversity: defining areas that promote species persistence and ecosystem resilience in the face of global climate change

WHEN: Thursday 24th of October 2013; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs- Dr April Reside, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, James Cook University. The most cost-effective solution for biodiversity conservation under climate change is to identify and protect those places in the landscape that will harbour many species from the worst impacts of climate change. April will present some of her work developing methods to identify refugial areas in Australia.Climate change refugia for terrestrial biodiversity: defining areas that promote species persistence and ecosystem resilience in the face of global climate change

Towards an evidence base for conservation priorities

WHEN: Thursday 17th of October 2013; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs- Professor Bob Pressey, ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies. How would we judge the relative effectiveness of approaches to identifying priority conservation areas? In his seminar, Professor Bob Pressey will outline directions for conservation science to move toward an evidence base.Towards an evidence base for conservation priorities

Larval dispersal: the critical connection in coral reef recovery

WHEN: Thursday 26th of September 2013; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs- Dr. Vimoksalehi Lukoschek, ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies. Vee will show results of her work on the genetic diversity of Acropora species in the GBR as a mean of understanding connectivity. She will also present results from a natural experiment of coral recovery and connectivity following the coral damage done by Yasi at the Palm Islands.Larval dispersal: the critical connection in coral reef recovery

Modelling all life on earth: The Madingley global ecosystem model

WHEN: Wednesday 25th of September 2013; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs- Dr. Mike Harfoot, United Nations Environment Programme World Conservation Monitoring Centre and Microsoft Research. Mike will present the Madingley model, a global ecosystem model for terrestrial and marine ecosystems that simulates distribution and abundance of organisms.Modelling all life on earth: The Madingley global ecosystem model

Pre-completion seminar : Coral larval ecology and biogeography in a warming ocean.

WHEN: Thursday, 19th of September 2013; 11:00 to 12:00 hrs - Erika Woolsey, ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies. Erika will present her work on thermal tolerance of coral larvae.Pre-completion seminar : Coral larval ecology and biogeography in a warming ocean.

A predator and its habitat: potential impacts of ocean acidification on the performance of a coral reef fish

WHEN: Thursday, 12th of September 2013; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - Dr Jodie Rummer, ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies. Jodie will present some results of her work on the impact of increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide on the metabolism of blue-spotted rockcod in the aim to increase our understanding of the interactions between ocean acidification and predator-prey dynamics and impacts on health of coral reef ecosytems.A predator and its habitat: potential impacts of ocean acidification on the performance of a coral reef fish

Confirmation seminar - Environmental influences on the reproductive, larval, and postsettlement biology of the crown-of-thorns starfish

WHEN: Friday, 6th of September 2013; 10:00 to 11:00 hrs - Ciemon Caballes, JCU Townsville. Ciemon will present his research project on the Crown-Of-Thorns Starfish. His main objective will be to better comprehend how various environmental parameters could affect COTS biology at early life stages ; and explain recent and future outbreaks.Confirmation seminar – Environmental influences on the reproductive, larval, and postsettlement biology of the crown-of-thorns starfish

Forget the crystal ball: Applying spatial scenarios to conservation planning for the GBR coast.

WHEN: Thursday, 5th of September 2013; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - Dr Amélie Auge, ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, JCU Townsville. Using the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area (GBRWHA) as example, Amélie will show why coastal management is such a great challenge for conservation planning and why we need a novel approach that requires forgetting the crystal ball most commonly used.Forget the crystal ball: Applying spatial scenarios to conservation planning for the GBR coast.

DIVERSITY: How did ecology get it so wrong and what's the solution?

WHEN: Thursday, 29th of August 2013; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - Dr Glenn De'ath, Australian Institute of Marine Science. Glen will present a new method to relate diversity to complex environmental, spatial and temporal predictors: the multinomial diversity model (MDM). This method uses the Shannon entropy and biodiversity concepts to provide simpler interpretations of complex datasets.DIVERSITY: How did ecology get it so wrong and what’s the  solution?

Carbon dioxide seeps in Papua New Guinea as a natural laboratory to investigate the effects of ocean acidification on coral reefs

WHEN: Thursday, 22nd of August 2013; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - Dr Katharina Fabricius. Volcanic CO2 seeps in Papua New Guinea provide a unique opportunity to study the effects of ocean acidification on marine organisms. This seminar will present key results and perspectives on how these organisms can cope with a naturally high CO2 environment.Carbon dioxide seeps in Papua New Guinea as a natural laboratory to investigate the effects of ocean acidification on coral reefs

Douglas Adams, Albert Einstein and economic techniques for ‘valuing’ the environment

WHEN: Thursday, 15th of July 2013; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - Prof. Natalie Stoeckl, James Cook University. Natalie will present and discuss several ways of attempting to generate macro-scale information about the value of environmental goods and services, presenting empirical examples from the GBR and elsewhere.Douglas Adams, Albert Einstein and economic techniques for ‘valuing’ the environment

The evolution of functionally referential meaning and meta-communication in a cooperative breeding game

WHEN: Thursday, 8th of July 2013; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - Stefan Walker, ARC Center of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies. Stefan will tackle the topic of the evolution of animal communication using his study on the cooperative sex allocation strategy in a reef fish and the implications for population ecology of coral reefs.The evolution of functionally referential meaning and meta-communication in a cooperative breeding game

Celebrating Research - Internal Three Minute Thesis (3MT®) Competition

WHEN: Friday, 2nd of August 2013; from 3PM - Melissa Bos, Josh Cinner and Aurelie Moya; from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies; will present a compelling oration on their thesis and its significance in just three minutes !Celebrating Research – Internal Three Minute Thesis (3MT®) Competition

The Virginia Chadwick Memorial Reef Talk Series

WHEN: Sunday 28 July 3pm - Townsville Civic Theatre. Dr. Alvaro Berg Soto and Dr. Thomas Bridge. Presentation 1: How to protect rare species of inshore dolphins in the Great Barrier Reef? - protecting some of Australia’s rarest marine mammals. Presentation 2: The deeper we go, the less we know: Exploring Queensland’s deep-water coral reefs.The Virginia Chadwick Memorial Reef Talk Series

Molecular bases underpinning critical early life history events in corals: identification of receptors involved in species-restricted fertilization, larval navigation and settlement

WHEN: Thursday, 25th of July 2013; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - Ben Mason, ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies. Ben will be presenting his current research on coral reproduction and development, focussing on identification and characterization of photo- and chemoreceptors involved in larval navigation and settlement and identification of egg receptors responsible for species-restricted fertilization.Molecular bases underpinning critical early life history events in corals: identification of receptors involved in species-restricted fertilization, larval navigation and settlement

Communication of socio-biological phenomena in space and time using informal mapping and art

WHEN: Thursday, 11th of July 2013; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - Antoni Moore, University of Otago. In this talk, Tony will present some of his research in GIS and visualisation, focussing on how informal mapping and art can be linked to scientific mapping and provide a more personal channel of spatial communication that often suits grassroots and community initiatives as well as public dissemination. He uses the case studies of the Bluff oyster fishery and the historical change of kea habitat to discuss this concept.Communication of socio-biological phenomena in space and time using informal mapping and art

Poverty Traps, Resilience and Resource Dynamics Among The Extreme Rural Poor

WHEN: Thursday, 4th of July 2013; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - Christopher Barrett, Cornell University. In this talk, Chris will discuss his research on poverty traps in smallholder agrarian systems in Africa, drawing out the links between ecological concepts of resilience and resistance and the economics of poverty traps, and will discuss a range of interventions aimed at helping the rural poor to exit poverty traps and build resilience without compromising the natural resources on which future generations depend.Poverty Traps, Resilience and Resource Dynamics Among The Extreme Rural Poor

Establishing a global baseline of marine biodiversity to assess impacts of human activity through the long term

WHEN: Tuesday, 25th of June 2013; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - Graham Edgar, Institute of Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania. In this talk, Graham will describe the Reef Life Survey, a program based on training of a small network of skilled recreational divers in the technical knowledge needed to quantitatively survey reef fishes, invertebrate and algal communities using standardised scientific methods. The dataset now includes information for >3500 species from 40 countries and >2000 sites, allowing the first global-scale assessments of inshore marine biodiversity using systematically-collected quantitative data.Establishing a global baseline of marine biodiversity to assess impacts of human activity through the long term

Spatial and temporal variation in the growth of branching corals

WHEN: Thursday, 30th of May 2013; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - Kristen Anderson, James Cook University. In this talk, Kristen will describe her ongoing research on growth of habitat-forming corals (e.g., Acropora muricata, Pocillopora damicornis), at a range of locations along the east coast of Australia. Her study is the first to assess decadal changes in growth of branching species along the east coast of Australia. By monitoring coral skeletal growth, a better understanding of the future composition of coral reef communities will be vital for management, conservation, and fisheries.Spatial and temporal variation in the growth of branching corals

Marine Conservation Finance: Securing Marine Ecological and Socio-cultural Outcomes through Innovative and Strategic Finance - Confirmation seminar

WHEN: Tuesday, 28th of May 2013; 9:00 to 10:00 hrs - Melissa Bos, James Cook University. Financial decisions are often made without stakeholder involvement. This research will investigate if and how impact investing can achieve marine conservation outcomes, design and test participatory processes for selecting marine finance mechanisms, and critically analyze the implementation of one finance mechanism in detail - marine biodiversity offsets in the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area.Marine Conservation Finance: Securing Marine Ecological and Socio-cultural Outcomes through Innovative and Strategic Finance – Confirmation seminar

Global biodiversity loss: stop worrying and start panicking

WHEN: Monday, 27th of May 2013; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - Camilo Mora, University of Hawaii. In this talk, Camilo will describe his work towards describing global biodiversity patterns and their underlying processes. He also analyzes the effectiveness of biodiversity protection and the future of biodiversity in light of looming environmental threats.Global biodiversity loss: stop worrying and start panicking

Double seminar: Coral reef research goes viral: determining the role of viruses in coral reefs.

WHEN: Thursday, 23rd of May 2013; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - Karen Weynberg and Elisha Wood-Charlson, Australian Institute of Marine Science. Viruses are often seen as harmful pathogens, but they can also be beneficial for the reef ecosystems. Their function and importance are still poorly understood. This double seminar will present an overview of the current research on viruses in the marine environment.Double seminar: Coral reef research goes viral: determining the role of viruses in coral reefs.

Exploring Social-Ecological Interactions in Hawaiian Coral Reefs: Implications for Managing Towards Sustainability

WHEN: Friday, 17th of May 2013; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - John N. Kittinger, Center for Ocean Solutions, Stanford University. In this talk, John will provide an overview of social-ecological relationships, with a focus on coral reefs in the Hawaiian Islands. He will also share novel methods and findings from participatory fishery assessments and recent efforts to quantitatively link fisheries ecology, ecosystem services, and community wellbeing at the local level.Exploring Social-Ecological Interactions in Hawaiian Coral Reefs: Implications for Managing Towards Sustainability



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