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PhD Mid-Candidature - Ciemon Caballes

Outbreaks of the crown-of-thorns starfish, Acanthaster planci, represent one of the most significant biological disturbances on coral reefs and remain one of the principal causes of widespread decline in live coral cover in Indo-Pacific reefs. This seminar will discuss the environmental constraints that could limit fertilization rates in A. planci and the interactive effects of high nutrient levels and low salinity on larval survival, growth, and development.PhD Mid-Candidature – Ciemon Caballes

Wellbeing, Life Satisfaction and the economic ‘value’ of ecosystem services

Seminar: Thursday 18th of March 2015 – 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. Professor Natalie Stoeckl has a BEc from the Australian National University (ANU), a MEc from JCU and a PhD from ANU. She is particularly interested in the environmental and distributional/equity issues associated with economic growth in rural / remote locations. Although fully ‘schooled’ in mainstream neoclassical economics, she feels most at home when working in multidisciplinary teams, and thinks of herself as an almost ‘lapsed’ (or at least heterodox) economist.Wellbeing, Life Satisfaction and the economic ‘value’ of ecosystem services

PhD Pre-Completion Seminar - Georgina Gurney

Protected areas (PAs) are a key strategy employed worldwide to maintain marine ecosystem services and mitigate biodiversity loss. However, the efficacy of PAs in achieving biological and socioeconomic goals is highly variable; a significant factor impeding their success is a lack of consideration and understanding of associated human systems. Therefore, the broad goal of my thesis was to investigate how socioeconomic factors can be incorporated into the design and management of PAs, which I addressed through three specific objectives.PhD Pre-Completion Seminar – Georgina Gurney

On the application of theories of judgement and decision making to the human dimensions of environmental change

Seminar: Wednesday 11th of March, 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. Terre Satterfield is an interdisciplinary social scientist; professor of culture, risk and the environment; and director (on leave 2014-2015) of the University of British Columbia’s Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability. Her research concerns human behaviour in the context of risk assessment, environmental policy and decision-making.On the application of theories of judgement and decision making to the human dimensions of environmental change

What good(s) are ecosystem services?

Seminar: Thursday 5th of March 2015 - 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. Prof Katrina Brown is Professor of Social Sciences at the Environment and Sustainability Institute at University of Exeter, UK. Her research focuses on vulnerability, adaptation and resilience, and ecosystem services and poverty alleviation.What good(s) are ecosystem services?

The tropicalization of temperate reef fish communities

Seminar: Thursday 26th of February 2015 - 13:00 to 14:00 hrs. Emanuel Gonçalves is Associate Professor at ISPA – Instituto Universitário (Portugal). His research interests are marine conservation (in particular the role of marine protected areas for ocean governance), marine ecology and connectivity in marine ecosystems, behaviour of marine animals, in particular fish, larval ecology and recruitment.The tropicalization of temperate reef fish communities

Ecosystem services and dimensions of well-being in deltas

Seminar: Thursday 19th of February 2015 - 16:00 to 17:00 hrs. Prof Neil Adger is a Professor of Human Geography at the University of Exeter, UK. He researches social dimensions of environmental change. He was an author on the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment and on reports of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. He is presently a Distinguished Visiting Scientist at CSIRO in Townsville working with the Resource Governance group.Ecosystem services and dimensions of well-being in deltas

Predicting climate-driven regime shifts versus rebound potential in coral reefs

WHEN: Thursday 12th of February 2015 - 16:00 to 17:00 hrs - Building 19 (Kevin Stark Research Building) Room #106 (upstairs), JCU, Townsville - Dr Nick Graham, ARC CoE for Coral Reef Studies. Conditions under which reefs bounce back from bleaching events or shift from coral to algal dominance are unknown, making it difficult to predict and plan for differing reef responses under climate change.Predicting climate-driven regime shifts versus rebound potential in coral reefs

Social-Ecological Linkages: an Integrative Systems Approach to Marine and Coastal Governance

12:00pm-1:00pm, Monday 2nd February 2015, Room 106, Building 19 (Kevin Stark Research Building), JCU, Townsville. Michele Barnes-Mauthe ARC CoE for Coral Reef Studies. Considering the scale of anthropogenic stress on the global oceans, we must have a strong understanding of the linkages and feedbacks between people and the marine environment in order to develop viable strategies to advance global sustainability and meet conservation goals.Social-Ecological Linkages: an Integrative Systems Approach to Marine and Coastal Governance

Using gene expression data to understand evolution and developmental mechanisms in calcareous sponges

WHEN: Monday 15th December 2014, 13.00 - 14.00 hrs, Building 19 (Kevin Stark Research Building) Room 106, JCU, Townsville - Sofia Fortunato, Sars Centre of Marine Molecular Biology, Bergen, Norway. Whole-genome sequencing of the local sponge Amphimedon queenslandica (class Demospongia) demonstrated that sponges have a limited repertoire of developmental transcription factors subfamilies in comparison to cnidarians and bilaterians.Using gene expression data to understand evolution and developmental mechanisms in calcareous sponges

Plasticity of reef fish to future environmental change

WHEN: Monday 15th December 2014, 11.00 - 12.00 hrs, Building 19 (Kevin Stark Research Building) Room 106, JCU, Townsville - Jenni Donelson, School of the Environment at the University of Technology, Sydney. An understanding of the capacity for species to acclimate and adapt to rapid climate change is critical for effective management and conservation of ecosystems in the future.Plasticity of reef fish to future environmental change

Responses of marine organisms to rising CO2

WHEN: Friday 12th December 2014, 13:30 - 14.30 hrs, Building 19 (Kevin Stark Research Building) Room 106, JCU, Townsville - Sue-Ann Watson, ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies. Global change, including ocean acidification, poses a serious threat to marine life. Ocean chemistry is changing 100 times faster than any period in the last 650,000 years and the oceans are already 30 % more acidic than 250 years ago. The effects of ocean acidification include reductions in growth, and altered developmental and physiological processes in marine organisms.Responses of marine organisms to rising CO2

The molecular, cellular and microbial responses of the coral holobiont to environmental change

11:00am-12:00pm, Friday 12th December 2014, Room 106, Building 19 (Kevin Stark Research Building), JCU, Townsville. Tracy Ainsworth ARC CoE for Coral Reef Studies. Globally sea surface temperatures (SST) have risen 0.6 °C are forecast to continue to rise rapidly within the next 80 years. Models predict that as a result on increasing SST tropical coral reefs will reach annual bleaching thresholds over the coming decades.The molecular, cellular and microbial responses of the coral holobiont to environmental change

How do scientists’ perceive their role at the ocean science-policy interface?

WHEN: Wednesday 10th of December 2014; 13:00 to 14:00 hrs - Murray Rudd, Environment Department, University of York. To achieve ocean sustainability requires engagement and collaboration between scientists and policy-makers; scientists' willingness to engage depends on their current and evolving perspectives on the science-policy interface.How do scientists’ perceive their role at the ocean science-policy interface?

Critically assessing actual institutional ‘solutions’ to complex environmental problems

WHEN: Tuesday 9th of December 2014; 11:00 to 12:00 hrs - Tiffany Morrison, University of Queensland. This seminar reports on a number of research projects which critically analyse real-world institutional solutions to complexity: regional governance networks in rural environments; adaptive planning regimes in riparian and coastal environments; and cumulative impact assessment regimes in coastal and marine environments.Critically assessing actual institutional ‘solutions’ to complex environmental problems

Ecotourism as a land-use system in southwest China: Conservation Implications for Himalayan old-growth forests

WHEN: Monday 8th of December 2014; 11:00 to 12:00 hrs - Jodi Brandt, Department of Environmental Studies, Dartmouth College. I present a series of studies that measure social and ecological outcomes of ecotourism in Tibetan areas of southwest China.Ecotourism as a land-use system in southwest China: Conservation Implications for Himalayan old-growth forests

Planning for the persistence of coral reef ecosystems

WHEN: Friday 5th of December 2014; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - Rebecca Weeks, ARC CoE Coral Reef Studies. Using case studies from the Coral Triangle and Pacific Islands, I will first demonstrate the implications of scale mismatches during conservation prioritisation. I will then evaluate efforts to resolve social-ecological scale mismatches through the formation of governance networks.Planning for the persistence of coral reef ecosystems

2 PhD mid-candidature seminars, Tessa Hempson and Chao-Yang Kuo

WHEN: Friday 28th of November 2014; 16:00 to 17:00 hrs - 2 PhD mid-candidature seminars. (1) Tessa Hempson, Mesopredators can switch prey in response to coral reef degradation at expense to their condition. (2) Chao-Yang Kuo, Long-term changes in the structure of inshore coral assemblages on the Great Barrier Reef2 PhD mid-candidature seminars, Tessa Hempson and Chao-Yang Kuo

A molecular approach of coral physiology

WHEN: Thursday 27th of November 2014; 16:00 to 17:00 hrs - Anthony Bertucci, ARC CoE Coral Reef Studies. I will outline three case studies where careful analysis allows managers to side-step difficult elements of a conservation problem, resulting in simpler and more confident decisions. Despite the projected loss of coral reefs and the direct socio-economic consequences associated with this loss, our fundamental understanding of the Cnidarian-Dinoflagellate physiology that underlies the ecological success of reefs remains poor.A molecular approach of coral physiology

Immunity and secondary metabolite production in the soft coral Lobophytum pauciflorum in competition and the effects of ocean acidification on these processes.

WHEN: Wednesday 26th of November 2014; 14:00 to 15:00 hrs - Natalia Andrade Rodriguez, ARC CoE Coral Reef Studies. This research will focused on the gene expression and secondary metabolite production of the soft coral Lobophytum pauciflorum in competition and in an immune challenge; and the effects of ocean acidification on them.Immunity and secondary metabolite production in the soft coral Lobophytum pauciflorum in competition and the effects of ocean acidification on these processes.

Coral Depth Zonation: Its nature and significance

WHEN: Tuesday 25th of November 2014; 11:00 to 12:00 hrs - Ed Roberts, ARC CoE Coral Reef Studies. This project will re-visit the distributional patterns of coral species over depth, and investigate the processes that modulate how species utilise vertical space.Coral Depth Zonation: Its nature and significance

Side-stepping difficulties in conservation management

WHEN: Monday 24th of November 2014; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - Michael Bode, University of Melbourne. I will outline three case studies where careful analysis allows managers to side-step difficult elements of a conservation problem, resulting in simpler and more confident decisions.Side-stepping difficulties in conservation management

Shifted ecological baselines on the nearshore Great Barrier Reef

WHEN: Thursday 20th of November 2014; 16:00 to 17:00 hrs - John Pandolfi, University of Queensland, Brisbane. Most records of the long-term ecological history of coral reefs are confined to the past few decades, long after degradation of such habitats first emerged.Shifted ecological baselines on the nearshore Great Barrier Reef

The implications of Chinese seafood trade and consumption

WHEN: Thursday 13th of November 2014; 10:00 to 11:00 hrs - Mike Fabinyi, ARC CoE Coral Reef Studies, JCU, Townsville. In this presentation I will provide an overview of research undertaken for my Society in Science - Branco Weiss fellowship.The implications of Chinese seafood trade and consumption

The relevance of geomorphology to coral reef science and management.

WHEN: Tuesday 11th of November 2014; 13:30 to 14:30 hrs - Scott Smithers, Faculty of Science and Engineering, JCU, Townsville. In this seminar I present some general geomorphological traits of the Great Barrier Reef of relevance to ecologists and managers, and use examples of geomorphological research on inshore reefs and reef islands of the Great Barrier Reef as case studies to show how geomorphological knowledge is relevant to some key challenges facing the Great Barrier Reef.The relevance of geomorphology to coral reef science and management.

Dive tourism and its impact on integrated coastal management and livelihoods for artisanal fishers

WHEN: Friday 14th of November 2014; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - Judi Lowe, ARC CoE Coral Reef Studies, JCU, Townsville. Dive tourism is cited for its capacity to contribute to integrated coastal management (ICM) and livelihoods for artisanal fishers. Many assume that livelihoods from dive tourism will give an incentive to fishers to reduce overfishing.Dive tourism and its impact on integrated coastal management and livelihoods for artisanal fishers

Professorial Inaugural Lecture: People and Reefs: A social scientist’s escapades confronting the coral reef crisis

WHEN: Wednesday 3 December 2014 at 6.00pm - I will highlight some of the bright spots I have encountered - places that have developed local solutions to sustain their reefs in the face of the most difficult circumstances. I will showcase a strategy for unlocking the potential of these local solutions at a global scale.Professorial Inaugural Lecture: People and Reefs: A social scientist’s escapades confronting the coral reef crisis

Development of ecological and social-ecological theory

WHEN: Tuesday 4th of November 2014; 11:00 to 12:00 hrs - Prof. Graeme Cumming, University of Cape Town, Republic of South Africa. I will explore three questions that I regard as central to the further development of ecological and social-ecological theory.Development of ecological and social-ecological theory

Confronting non-compliance in marine reserves

WHEN: Thursday 23rd of October 2014; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - Brock Bergseth, ARC CoE Coral Reef Studies. The aim of this project is to examine the methods used to measure compliance, and explore the drivers of recreational fishers’ compliance decisionsConfronting non-compliance in marine reserves

Sustaining Coastal Livelihoods and Ecosystems

WHEN: Wednesday 22nd of October 2014; 15:45 to 16:45 hrs - Joshua Cinner, ARC CoE Coral Reef Studies. In this talk, I highlight some of the interdisciplinary efforts my research group and I have taken to link social and ecological research on the sustainable use and governance of coral reefs.Sustaining Coastal Livelihoods and Ecosystems

Engaging local communities in conservation planning in an era of rapid environmental change

WHEN: Wednesday 22nd of October 2014; 14:30 to 15:30 hrs - Christopher Raymond, University of Tasmania. In this presentation, I will explore concepts, methods and applications directed towards effectively engaging local communities in conservation planning in an era of rapid environmental change.Engaging local communities in conservation planning in an era of rapid environmental change

Drivers of colony-level variation in condition and resilience for reef-building corals

WHEN: Tuesday 14th of October 2014; 10:00 to 11:00 hrs - Chiara Pisapia, ARC CoE Coral Reef Studies. Many studies have documented significant variation in the capacity of corals to withstand and recover from major disturbances, but the underlying basis of this variation is still poorly understood.Drivers of colony-level variation in condition and resilience for reef-building corals

Effects of sedimentation, eutrophication and chemical pollution on coral reef fishes

WHEN: Thursday 9th of October 2014; 16:00 to 17:00 hrs - Amelia Wenger, ARC CoE Coral Reef Studies. I will present the current state of knowledge on the direct and indirect effects of marine pollution on the behaviour, physiology, life histories and communities of coral reef fishes, and the potential consequences of altered fish abundances for the ecology of coral reefs.Effects of sedimentation, eutrophication and chemical pollution on coral reef fishes

Habitat fragmentation: How does it affect coral reef fish biodiversity?

WHEN: Thursday 2nd of October 2014; 16:00 to 17:00 hrs - Mary Bonin, ARC CoE Coral Reef Studies. In this talk I will review what is known about fragmentation effects from studies in other systems and use this as a basis to develop the first tests of fragmentation effects on coral reef fishes.Habitat fragmentation: How does it affect coral reef fish biodiversity?

Empirical and theoretical insights into the resilience of Pacific coral reefs

WHEN: Thursday 18th of September 2014; 16:00 to 17:00 hrs - Peter Mumby, University of Queensland, Brisbane. I present a combination of new empirical studies from Palau and a new model of Australian coral reefs and ask how different Pacific are from the Caribbean and what are the projections under climate change.Empirical and theoretical insights into the resilience of Pacific coral reefs

Spherical chicken in vacuum as a prototype of a crystal ball for conservation managers

WHEN: Thursday 14th of August 2014; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - Jana Brotankova, ARC CoE Coral Reef Studies, Townsville. A new conservation planning software package is being developed at James Cook University, with a ground-breaking approach to address limitations for real-world problems.Spherical chicken in vacuum as a prototype of a crystal ball for conservation managers

Towards explicit objectives for connectivity in conservation planning

The need to consider connectivity in the design of marine reserve networks has long been recognised. Connectivity processes, with larval dispersal key amongst these, are critical to whether species persist in a region, how they respond to natural and anthropogenic disturbances, and how they should be managed.Towards explicit objectives for connectivity in conservation planning

A Sea of Small Boats: Importance and Vulnerability of Coastal Livelihoods

Through fieldwork on small-scale fisheries, small and commercial-scale aquaculture in Mozambique and Solomon Islands, I will explore the importance and vulnerability of marine resource-based livelihoods.A Sea of Small Boats: Importance and Vulnerability of Coastal Livelihoods

Terrestrial protected areas and the successful conservation of global wildlife populations

WHEN: Thursday 14th of August 2014; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - Ian Craigie, ARC CoE Coral Reef Studies, Townsville. In this study we used linear mixed effect models to explore correlates of population change in 1902 populations of birds and mammals from 447 PAs globally.Terrestrial protected areas and the successful conservation of global wildlife populations

Spatial planning in the Dutch North Sea: MPAs, wind farms and the effects on the ecosystem.

WHEN: Thursday 7th of August 2014; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - Prof Han Lindeboom, Wageningen University, Netherlands. Already for almost 25 years, The Netherlands has been talking about the creation of Marine Protected Areas in the open North Sea, but so far no real protective measures have been taken.Spatial planning in the Dutch North Sea: MPAs, wind farms and the effects on the ecosystem.



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