Seminars

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2 PhD mid-candidature seminars, Tessa Hempson and Chao-Yang Kuo

WHEN: Friday 28th of November 2014; 16:00 to 17:00 hrs - 2 PhD mid-candidature seminars. (1) Tessa Hempson, Mesopredators can switch prey in response to coral reef degradation at expense to their condition. (2) Chao-Yang Kuo, Long-term changes in the structure of inshore coral assemblages on the Great Barrier Reef2 PhD mid-candidature seminars, Tessa Hempson and Chao-Yang Kuo

A molecular approach of coral physiology

WHEN: Thursday 27th of November 2014; 16:00 to 17:00 hrs - Anthony Bertucci, ARC CoE Coral Reef Studies. I will outline three case studies where careful analysis allows managers to side-step difficult elements of a conservation problem, resulting in simpler and more confident decisions. Despite the projected loss of coral reefs and the direct socio-economic consequences associated with this loss, our fundamental understanding of the Cnidarian-Dinoflagellate physiology that underlies the ecological success of reefs remains poor.A molecular approach of coral physiology

Immunity and secondary metabolite production in the soft coral Lobophytum pauciflorum in competition and the effects of ocean acidification on these processes.

WHEN: Wednesday 26th of November 2014; 14:00 to 15:00 hrs - Natalia Andrade Rodriguez, ARC CoE Coral Reef Studies. This research will focused on the gene expression and secondary metabolite production of the soft coral Lobophytum pauciflorum in competition and in an immune challenge; and the effects of ocean acidification on them.Immunity and secondary metabolite production in the soft coral Lobophytum pauciflorum in competition and the effects of ocean acidification on these processes.

Coral Depth Zonation: Its nature and significance

WHEN: Tuesday 25th of November 2014; 11:00 to 12:00 hrs - Ed Roberts, ARC CoE Coral Reef Studies. This project will re-visit the distributional patterns of coral species over depth, and investigate the processes that modulate how species utilise vertical space.Coral Depth Zonation: Its nature and significance

Side-stepping difficulties in conservation management

WHEN: Monday 24th of November 2014; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - Michael Bode, University of Melbourne. I will outline three case studies where careful analysis allows managers to side-step difficult elements of a conservation problem, resulting in simpler and more confident decisions.Side-stepping difficulties in conservation management

Shifted ecological baselines on the nearshore Great Barrier Reef

WHEN: Thursday 20th of November 2014; 16:00 to 17:00 hrs - John Pandolfi, University of Queensland, Brisbane. Most records of the long-term ecological history of coral reefs are confined to the past few decades, long after degradation of such habitats first emerged.Shifted ecological baselines on the nearshore Great Barrier Reef

The implications of Chinese seafood trade and consumption

WHEN: Thursday 13th of November 2014; 10:00 to 11:00 hrs - Mike Fabinyi, ARC CoE Coral Reef Studies, JCU, Townsville. In this presentation I will provide an overview of research undertaken for my Society in Science - Branco Weiss fellowship.The implications of Chinese seafood trade and consumption

The relevance of geomorphology to coral reef science and management.

WHEN: Tuesday 11th of November 2014; 13:30 to 14:30 hrs - Scott Smithers, Faculty of Science and Engineering, JCU, Townsville. In this seminar I present some general geomorphological traits of the Great Barrier Reef of relevance to ecologists and managers, and use examples of geomorphological research on inshore reefs and reef islands of the Great Barrier Reef as case studies to show how geomorphological knowledge is relevant to some key challenges facing the Great Barrier Reef.The relevance of geomorphology to coral reef science and management.

Dive tourism and its impact on integrated coastal management and livelihoods for artisanal fishers

WHEN: Friday 14th of November 2014; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - Judi Lowe, ARC CoE Coral Reef Studies, JCU, Townsville. Dive tourism is cited for its capacity to contribute to integrated coastal management (ICM) and livelihoods for artisanal fishers. Many assume that livelihoods from dive tourism will give an incentive to fishers to reduce overfishing.Dive tourism and its impact on integrated coastal management and livelihoods for artisanal fishers

Professorial Inaugural Lecture: People and Reefs: A social scientist’s escapades confronting the coral reef crisis

WHEN: Wednesday 3 December 2014 at 6.00pm - I will highlight some of the bright spots I have encountered - places that have developed local solutions to sustain their reefs in the face of the most difficult circumstances. I will showcase a strategy for unlocking the potential of these local solutions at a global scale.Professorial Inaugural Lecture: People and Reefs: A social scientist’s escapades confronting the coral reef crisis

Development of ecological and social-ecological theory

WHEN: Tuesday 4th of November 2014; 11:00 to 12:00 hrs - Prof. Graeme Cumming, University of Cape Town, Republic of South Africa. I will explore three questions that I regard as central to the further development of ecological and social-ecological theory.Development of ecological and social-ecological theory

Confronting non-compliance in marine reserves

WHEN: Thursday 23rd of October 2014; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - Brock Bergseth, ARC CoE Coral Reef Studies. The aim of this project is to examine the methods used to measure compliance, and explore the drivers of recreational fishers’ compliance decisionsConfronting non-compliance in marine reserves

Sustaining Coastal Livelihoods and Ecosystems

WHEN: Wednesday 22nd of October 2014; 15:45 to 16:45 hrs - Joshua Cinner, ARC CoE Coral Reef Studies. In this talk, I highlight some of the interdisciplinary efforts my research group and I have taken to link social and ecological research on the sustainable use and governance of coral reefs.Sustaining Coastal Livelihoods and Ecosystems

Engaging local communities in conservation planning in an era of rapid environmental change

WHEN: Wednesday 22nd of October 2014; 14:30 to 15:30 hrs - Christopher Raymond, University of Tasmania. In this presentation, I will explore concepts, methods and applications directed towards effectively engaging local communities in conservation planning in an era of rapid environmental change.Engaging local communities in conservation planning in an era of rapid environmental change

Drivers of colony-level variation in condition and resilience for reef-building corals

WHEN: Tuesday 14th of October 2014; 10:00 to 11:00 hrs - Chiara Pisapia, ARC CoE Coral Reef Studies. Many studies have documented significant variation in the capacity of corals to withstand and recover from major disturbances, but the underlying basis of this variation is still poorly understood.Drivers of colony-level variation in condition and resilience for reef-building corals

Effects of sedimentation, eutrophication and chemical pollution on coral reef fishes

WHEN: Thursday 9th of October 2014; 16:00 to 17:00 hrs - Amelia Wenger, ARC CoE Coral Reef Studies. I will present the current state of knowledge on the direct and indirect effects of marine pollution on the behaviour, physiology, life histories and communities of coral reef fishes, and the potential consequences of altered fish abundances for the ecology of coral reefs.Effects of sedimentation, eutrophication and chemical pollution on coral reef fishes

Habitat fragmentation: How does it affect coral reef fish biodiversity?

WHEN: Thursday 2nd of October 2014; 16:00 to 17:00 hrs - Mary Bonin, ARC CoE Coral Reef Studies. In this talk I will review what is known about fragmentation effects from studies in other systems and use this as a basis to develop the first tests of fragmentation effects on coral reef fishes.Habitat fragmentation: How does it affect coral reef fish biodiversity?

Empirical and theoretical insights into the resilience of Pacific coral reefs

WHEN: Thursday 18th of September 2014; 16:00 to 17:00 hrs - Peter Mumby, University of Queensland, Brisbane. I present a combination of new empirical studies from Palau and a new model of Australian coral reefs and ask how different Pacific are from the Caribbean and what are the projections under climate change.Empirical and theoretical insights into the resilience of Pacific coral reefs

Spherical chicken in vacuum as a prototype of a crystal ball for conservation managers

WHEN: Thursday 14th of August 2014; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - Jana Brotankova, ARC CoE Coral Reef Studies, Townsville. A new conservation planning software package is being developed at James Cook University, with a ground-breaking approach to address limitations for real-world problems.Spherical chicken in vacuum as a prototype of a crystal ball for conservation managers

Towards explicit objectives for connectivity in conservation planning

The need to consider connectivity in the design of marine reserve networks has long been recognised. Connectivity processes, with larval dispersal key amongst these, are critical to whether species persist in a region, how they respond to natural and anthropogenic disturbances, and how they should be managed.Towards explicit objectives for connectivity in conservation planning

A Sea of Small Boats: Importance and Vulnerability of Coastal Livelihoods

Through fieldwork on small-scale fisheries, small and commercial-scale aquaculture in Mozambique and Solomon Islands, I will explore the importance and vulnerability of marine resource-based livelihoods.A Sea of Small Boats: Importance and Vulnerability of Coastal Livelihoods

Terrestrial protected areas and the successful conservation of global wildlife populations

WHEN: Thursday 14th of August 2014; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - Ian Craigie, ARC CoE Coral Reef Studies, Townsville. In this study we used linear mixed effect models to explore correlates of population change in 1902 populations of birds and mammals from 447 PAs globally.Terrestrial protected areas and the successful conservation of global wildlife populations

Spatial planning in the Dutch North Sea: MPAs, wind farms and the effects on the ecosystem.

WHEN: Thursday 7th of August 2014; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - Prof Han Lindeboom, Wageningen University, Netherlands. Already for almost 25 years, The Netherlands has been talking about the creation of Marine Protected Areas in the open North Sea, but so far no real protective measures have been taken.Spatial planning in the Dutch North Sea: MPAs, wind farms and the effects on the ecosystem.

A practical approach to design a network of marine reserves in the Midriff Islands (Gulf of California) considering connectivity and climate change

WHEN: Thursday 31st of July 2014; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - Jorge Alvarez Romero, ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, Townsville. Our study aimed to develop a practical approach to design networks of marine reserves that consider ecological connectivity and the effects of climate change.A practical approach to design a network of marine reserves in the Midriff Islands (Gulf of California) considering connectivity and climate change

Sensitivity of coral trout (Plectropomus) to increasing temperature, ocean acidification and habitat degradation

WHEN: Thursday 24th of July 2014; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - Morgan Pratchett, ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, Townsville. A team of researchers (led by Professors Morgan Pratchett and Philip Munday) have embarked on an ambitious study to examine comprehensive effects of climate change on coral trout.Sensitivity of coral trout (Plectropomus) to increasing temperature, ocean acidification and habitat degradation

Trait-based ecology of coral reef fishes

WHEN: Thursday 17th of July 2014; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - Osmar Luiz, Macquarie University, Sydney. This talk review recent applications of trait based approaches to the dispersal ecology and conservation of reef fishes and provide fresh perspectives for future studies using reef fish biological traits.Trait-based ecology of coral reef fishes

A cost-benefit analysis of unilateral conservation of a transboundary resource

WHEN: Monday 14th of July 2014; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - Dale Squires, NOAA Fisheries. This study examines the economic costs and benefits of countries attempting to unilaterally manage transboundary resources.A cost-benefit analysis of unilateral conservation of a transboundary resource

Caribbean reef ecosystem decline: changing dynamics of coral reef carbonate production and implications for future reef growth potential

Global-scale deteriorations in coral reef health have caused major shifts in species composition and are likely to be exacerbated by climate change. It has been suggested that one effect of these observed and projected ecological changes will be lower carbonate production rates on coral reefs.Caribbean reef ecosystem decline: changing dynamics of coral reef carbonate production and implications for future reef growth potential

Virginia Chadwick Memorial Reef Talk - Fish on Acid: Will Ocean Acidification Drive Fish Crazy?

In this talk I will examine the potential effects of ocean acidification on reef fishes.Virginia Chadwick Memorial Reef Talk – Fish on Acid: Will Ocean Acidification Drive Fish Crazy?

Managing hawksbill turtles and bumphead parrotfish in Solomon Islands through participatory research and community based conservation

WHEN: Thursday 26th of June 2014; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - Richard Hamilton, The Nature Conservancy. In Solomon Islands the critically endangered hawksbill turtle and the threatened bumphead parrotfish have formed an important component of the cultural value systems and subsistence economies for centuries.Managing hawksbill turtles and bumphead parrotfish in Solomon Islands through participatory research and community based conservation

What do Australians think about the Great Barrier Reef and why does it matter?

WHEN: Thursday 19th of June 2014; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - Jeremy Goldberg, JCU School of Business and CSIRO Ecosystem Science group. CSIRO conducted a nationally representative online survey of more than 2,000 Australian residents to explore four key areas related to the GBR: inspiration, visitation, attitudes and perceptions of threats. We found that Australians are overwhelmingly concerned about and connected to the GBR.What do Australians think about the Great Barrier Reef and why does it matter?

Agriculture, mining and the future of tropical nature

WHEN: Thursday 5th of June 2014; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - Prof Jeff Sayer, College of Marine and Environmental Sciences, James Cook University, Cairns. A perfect wave of land use conflicts is emerging in many tropical developing countries. This has major implications for conservation investments. Conservationists will have to make hard choices and these should be based upon evidence and not emotion.Agriculture, mining and the future of tropical nature

Predicting the effects of environmental change on the productivity of coral communities

In this seminar I will describe recent research that aims to generalize the responses of multiple coral species by developing a new coral ‘ecological strategy scheme’.Predicting the effects of environmental change on the productivity of coral communities

Climate warming, overfishing & global phase-shift dynamics of catastrophic sea urchin grazing

In this presentation, I will detail the key findings from over a decade of research on the ongoing threat of urchin overgrazing in eastern Tasmania.Climate warming, overfishing & global phase-shift dynamics of catastrophic sea urchin grazing

Professorial Inaugural Lecture: Rapid recovery of degraded reefs following high human mortality from the Indian Ocean Tsunami

Coral reefs are in global decline largely as a result of climate change and ongoing destructive human activities, such as overfishing and poorly managed coastal development.Professorial Inaugural Lecture: Rapid recovery of degraded reefs following high human mortality from the Indian Ocean Tsunami

What drives larval transport: from the beaker to the ocean

WHEN: Thursday 15th of May 2014; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - Anna Metaxas, Dalhousie University, Canada. Our research measures larval behaviours in tractable laboratory experiments that can explain larval distributions observed in the field and can be included in biophysical models to predict larval transport.What drives larval transport: from the beaker to the ocean

Increasing the Odds of Making a Difference-Perspectives on the Role of Theory in Strategic Communication

WHEN: Thursday 8th of May 2014; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - Prof. Sam Ham, University of Idaho, Moscow ID, USA. In this informal seminar, Prof Ham will talk with us about his thematic approach to communication and what he calls "making a difference on purpose." We have much to learn about the causal effects of communication on human cognition and behavior.Increasing the Odds of Making a Difference-Perspectives on the Role of Theory in Strategic Communication

Adaptive strategies of scleractinian corals

WHEN: Thursday 24th of April 2014; 10:00 to 11:00 hrs - Chao-Yang Kuo, ARC CoE for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University. This project aims to test whether Universal adaptive strategy theory (UAST) can does apply to scleractinian corals and if so, are adaptive strategy groups more effective at predicting the response of an assemblage to disturbance than approaches based on either taxonomy or morphology.Adaptive strategies of scleractinian corals

Vulnerability of coral reef fisheries to a loss of structural complexity

WHEN: Thursday 24th of April 2014; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - Alice Rogers, University of Queensland. We do not yet have the ability to predict how habitat loss might affect the productivity of whole reef communities and the fisheries they support. Using data from an un-fished reserve in the Bahamas, we find that structural complexity is not only associated with increased fish biomass and abundance, but also with non-linearities in the size spectra of fish, implying disproportionately high abundances of certain size classes.Vulnerability of coral reef fisheries to a loss of structural complexity

Resource limitation in reef fish communities: a macroecological approach

WHEN: Wednesday 16th of April 2014; 12:00 to 13:00 hrs - Richard Taylor, University of Auckland’s Leigh Marine Laboratory, New Zealand. Richard will present global patterns in the abundance, biomass and species richness of reef fishes, using Reef Life Survey data from 1,825 sites in 11 biogeographic realms.Resource limitation in reef fish communities: a macroecological approach



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